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EMW-2016-CA-APP-00294 

Application Information 


Application Number: EMW-2016-CA-APP-00294 

Funding Opportunity Name: FY 2016 Countering Violent Extremism Grants 

Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-16-OCP-132-00-01 
Application Status: Pending Review 

Applicant Information 

Legal Name: City of Los Angeles-Mayor's Office of Public Safety 

Organization ID: 17976 

Type: City or township governments 

Division: Mayor's Office 

Department: Public Safety 

EIN Shared With Organizations: 

DUNS: 611501243 
DUNS 4: 0000 

Congressional District: Congressional District 34, CA 

Physical Address 

Address Line 1 : 200 North Spring St 

Address Line 2: Suite 303 

City: Los Angeles 

State: California 

Province: 

Zip: 90012-3239 
Country: UNITED STATES 

Mailing Address 

Address Line 1 : 200 North Spring St 

Address Line 2: Suite 303 

City: Los Angeles 

State: California 

Province: 

Zip: 90012-3239 
Country: UNITED STATES 

SF-424 Information 

Project Information 

Project Title: Building Healthy Communities in Los Angeles - Managing Intervention Activities 
Program/Project Congressional Districts: Congressional District 34, CA 
Proposed Start Date: Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2016 
Proposed End Date: Fri Nov 30 00:00:00 EST 2018 

Areas Affected by Project (Cities, Counties, States, etc.): City of Los Angeles and the surrounding region 


Estimated Funding 


Funding Source 

Estimated Funding ($) 

Federal Funding 

$500000 

Applicant Funding 

$0 

State Funding 

$0 

Local Funding 

$0 

Other Funding 

$0 

Program Income Funding 

$0 

Total Funding 

$500000 


Is application subject to review by state under the Executive Order 12373 process? Program is not covered by E.O. 
12372. 

Is applicant delinquent on any federal debt? false 


Contacts 


Contact Name 


Email 


Primary Phone Number 


Contact Types 


Donna Ota 


Thalia Polychronis 



Authorized Official Primary 
Contact 

Signatory Authority Secondary 
Contact 


SF-424A 

Budget Information for Non-Construction Programs 


Grant Program: Countering Violent Extremism Grant Program 
CFDA Number: 97.132 


Budget Object Class 

Amount 

Personnel 

$0 

Fringe Benefits 

$0 

Travel 

$5000 

Equipment 

$0 

Supplies 

$0 

Contractual 

$495000 

Construction 

$0 

Other 

$0 

Indirect Charges 

$0 

Non-Federal Resources 

Amount 

Applicant 

$0 

State 

$0 

Other 

$0 

Income 

Amount 

Program Income 

$0 


How are you requesting to use this Program Income? [$budget.programlncomeType] 


Direct Charges Explanation: 
Indirect Charges explanation: 


































Forecasted Cash Needs (Optional) 



First Quarter 

Second Quarter 

Third Quarter 

Fourth Quarter 

Federal 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Non-Federal 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


Future Funding Periods (Years) (Optional) 


First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


Remarks: 

SF-424C 

Budget Information for Construction Programs 

Assurances for Non-Construction Programs 

Form not applicable? false 
Signatory Authority Name: Donna Ota 
Signed Date: Tue Sep 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016 
Signatory Authority Title: Executive Officer 

Certification Regarding Lobbying 

Form not applicable? false 
Signatory Authority Name: Donna Ota 
Signed Date: Tue Sep 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016 
Signatory Authority Title: Executive Officer 

Disciosure of Lobbying Activities 

Form not applicable? true 

Signatory Authority Name: Thalia Polychronis 

Signed Date: 

Signatory Authority Title: 




























CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING 


Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements 
The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowiedge and beiief, that: 

(1) No Federai appropriated funds have been paid or wiii be paid, by or on behaif of the undersigned, to any 
person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or empioyee of an agency, a Member of 
Congress, an officer or empioyee of Congress, or an empioyee of a Member of Congress in connection with 
the awarding of any Federai contract, the making of any Federai grant, the making of any Federai ioan, the 
entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewai, amendment, or 
modification of any Federai contract, grant, ioan, or cooperative agreement. 

(2) if any funds other than Federai appropriated funds have been paid or wiii be paid to any person for 
influencing or attempting to influence an officer or empioyee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an 
officer or empioyee of Congress, or an empioyee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federai 
contract, grant, ioan, or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shaii compiete and submit Standard 
Form-LLL, "Disciosure of Lobbying Activities," in accordance with its instructions. 


(3) The undersigned shaii require that the ianguage of this certification be inciuded in the award documents 
for aii subawards at aii tiers (inciuding subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under grants, ioans, and 
cooperative agreements) and that aii subrecipients shaii certify and disciose accordingiy. This certification 
is a materiai representation of fact upon which reiiance was piaced when this transaction was made or 
entered into. Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction 
imposed by section 1352, titie 31, U.S. Code. Any person who faiis to fiie the required certification shaii be 
subject to a civii penaity of not iess than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such faiiure. 

Statement for Loan Guarantees and Loan Insurance 

The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowiedge and beiief, that: 

if any funds have been paid or wiii be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer 
or empioyee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or empioyee of Congress, or an empioyee of 
a Member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or 
guarantee a ioan, the undersigned shaii compiete and submit Standard Form-LLL, "Disciosure of Lobbying 
Activities," in accordance with its instructions. Submission of this statement is a prerequisite for making or 
entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, titie 31, U.S. Code. Any person who faiis to fiie the 
required statement shaii be subject to a civii penaity of not iess than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 
for each such faiiure. 


* APPLiCANT'S ORGANiZATION 

City of Los Angeles-Mayor's Office of Public Safety 


' PRiNTED NAME AND TiTLE OF AUTHORiZED REPRESENTATIVE 
Prefix: 


Ms. 

* First Name: 

Thalia 

Middie Name: 



' Last Name: 
■ Titie: 


Polychronis 


Suffix: 


Executive Officer 


’ SiGNATURE: Donna Ota 


DATE: 09 / 02/2016 


Tracking Number:GRANT12240601 


Funding Opportunity Number:DHS-16-OCP-132-00-01 Received Date:Sep 02, 2016 04:46:42 PM EDT 






OMB Number: 4040-0004 
Expiration Date: 8/31/2016 


Application for Federal Assistance SF-424 


* 1. Type of Submission: 

I I Preapplication 
IXI Application 

I I Changed/Corrected Application 

* 3. Date Received: 


* 2. Type of Application: 
^New 
I I Continuation 
I I Revision 

4. Applicant Identifier: 


' If Revision, select appropriate letter(s): 


' Other (Specify): 


09 / 02/2016 


5a. Federal Entity Identifier: 


5b. Federal Award Identifier: 


DHS-16-OCP-132-00-01 


State Use Only: 




7. State Application Identifier: 



6. Date Received by State: 


8. APPLICANT INFORMATION: 


* a. Legal Name: 


City of Los Angeles-Mayor's Office of Public Safety 


' b. Employer/Taxpayer Identification Number (EIN/TIN): 


95-6000735 


* c. Organizational DUNS: 


6115012430000 


d. Address: 


‘ Streetl: 
Street2: 

* City: 

County/Parish: 

* State: 
Province: 

* Country: 


200 North Spring Street 


Room 303 


Los Angeles 


' Zip / Postal Code: 90012-3239 


CA: Califor 

nia 



USA: UNITED STATES 


e. Organizational Unit: 


Department Name: 


Mayor's Office 


Division Name: 


Public Safety 


f. Name and contact information of person to be contacted on matters invoiving this appiication: 


Prefix: 

Middle Name: 
* Last Name: 
Suffix: 


Ms . 


’ First Name: 


Thalia 


Polychronis 


Title: 


Executive Officer 


Crganizational Affiliation: 


* Telephone Number: 


Fax Number: 


' Email: 


Tracking Number:GRANT12240601 


Funding Cpportunity Number:DHS-16-OCP-132'00'01 Received Date:Sep 02, 2016 04:46:42 PM EDT 








































































































Application for Federal Assistance SF-424 


* 9. Type of Applicant 1: Select Applicant Type: 

C: City or Township Government 
Type of Applicant 2: Select Applicant Type; 


Type of Applicant 3; Select Applicant Type; 


* Other (specify); 


* 10. Name of Federal Agency: 

Department of Homeland Security - FEMA 


11. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number: 

97.132 


CFDA Title: 

Financial Assistance for Countering Violent Extremism 


* 12. Funding Opportunity Number: 

DHS-16-OCP-132-00-01 


•Title; 

FY 2016 Countering Violent Extremism Grants 


13. Competition Identification Number: 



14. Areas Affected by Project (Cities, Counties, States, etc.): 


Add Attachment 


Delete Attachment 


View Attachment 


*15. Descriptive Title of Applicant's Project: 

Building Healthy Communities in Los Angeles - Managing Intervention Activities 


Attach supporting documents as specified in agency instructions. 


Add Attachments 

Delete Attachments 


View Attachments 


Tracking Number:GRANT 12240601 


Funding Opportunity Number:DHS-16-OCP-132-00-01 Received Date:Sep 02,2016 04:46:42 PM EDT 























































































Application for Federal Assistance SF-424 

16. Congressional Districts Of: 




* a. Applicant cA 

* b. Program/Project 

34 


Attach an additional list of Program/Pnoject Congressional Districts if needed. 


Add Attachment Delete Attachment 

View Attachment 

17. Proposed Project: 




* a. Start Date: 12/01/2016 

* b. End Date: 

11/30/2018 


18. Estimated Funding ($): 



* a. Federal 

500,000.00 

* b. Applicant 

0.00 

* c. State 

0.00 

’ d. Local 

0.00 

* e. Other 

0.00 

* f Program Income 

0.00 

* g. TOTAL 

500,000.00 


* 19. Is Application Subject to Review By State Under Executive Order 12372 Process? 

I I a. This application was made available to the State under the Executive Order 12372 Process for review on 
I I b. Program is subject to E.0.12372 but has not been selected by the State for review. 

M c. Program is not covered by E.0.12372. 


* 20. Is the Applicant Delinquent On Any Federal Debt? (If "Yes," provide explanation in attachment.) 

□ Yes □No 

If "Yes", provide explanation and attach 


Add Attachment 


Delete Attachment 


View Attachment 


21. *By signing this application, I certify (1) to the statements contained in the iist of certifications'* and (2) that the statements 
herein are true, complete and accurate to the best of my knowledge. I also provide the required assurances" and agree to 
compiy with any resuiting terms if I accept an award, i am aware that any faise, fictitious, or frauduient statements or ciaims may 
subject me to criminal, civil, or administrative penalties. (U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001) 

□ ** I AGREE 

** The iist of certifications and assurances, or an internet site where you may obtain this list, is contained in the announcement or agency 
specific instructions. 


Authorized Representative: 


Prefix: 

Middie Name: 
* Last Name: 
Suffix: 


Ms. 


' First Name: Thalia 


Polychronis 


' Title: 


Executive Officer 


* Telephone Number 


Fax Number 


' Signature of Authorized Representative: Donna Ota 


* Date Signed: 09 / 02/2016 


Tracking NumbertGRANT 12240601 


Funding Opportunity Number:DHS-16-OCP-132-00-01 Received Date:Sep 02,2016 04:46:42 PM EDT 













































































































































The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


I. The Context for the Los Angeles Countering Violent 
Extremism (CVE) Framework 

Scope: Violent extremism poses a threat that is neither constrained by international 
borders nor limited to a single ideology. Groups and individuals are inspired by a range 
of religious, political, and ideological beliefs to promote and engage in violence. The 
threat posed by violent extremists has also become increasingly complex due to the 
sophisticated use of the Internet, mainstream and social media, information technology, 
and targeting of youth populations. 

The preservation of civil rights and civil liberties is a key pillar of the Los Angeles CVE 
Framework. Building on that strong foundation, the Framework is designed to mitigate 
the risk presented by violent extremist groups while preserving individual liberty, 
fairness, and equality under the law. Under the Los Angeles CVE Framework, the 
community-engagement programs conducted by law enforcement and government 
agencies are aimed at establishing trust and strengthening community partnerships. 

The concepts presented in the Los Angeles CVE Framework are designed to address a 
broad spectrum of extremist ideology that promotes violence and criminal activity. This 
document, however, highlights foundational partnerships with American-Muslim 
communities because these communities are leading efforts to develop some of the 
most innovative prevention and intervention programs in the region. The work being 
conducted in this Framework provides knowledge and experience on best practices that 
can inform both local and national strategies on combating violent extremism and hate. 
A core premise of the Los Angeles CVE Framework is that healthy and resilient 
communities are the foundation for a strong defense against all forms of violence. 

Strategic Advantages: Initial collaborative CVE efforts in the greater Los Angeles area 
began in 2008. These early efforts evolved around building interagency trust and 
developing strategies that helped formalize a collaborative “whole of government” and 
“whole of community” approach to CVE. It was also through these efforts that in 2011, 
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) partnered with the City of Los Angeles to 
establish the first DHS Office for Strategic Engagement, which was largely due to a 
request by local government and nongovernment entities to DHS to bring subject matter 
expertise to the region to assist in expanding engagement initiatives. 

Another advantage in Los Angeles has been the foundational work undertaken by 
academic institutions and local community-based organizations in building healthy and 
resilient communities. Government partners continue to foster community resiliency 
and encourage an environment in which precursor elements of violent extremism 
cannot take root. Consistent with a “whole of community” approach, Los Angeles has 
multiple and vibrant community-driven initiatives through which non-governmental 
organizations (NGOs), as well as academic institutions, are actively bridging community 
gaps and providing youth and leadership programming, advocacy and civil rights 
education, social services, community awareness, and education awareness workshops 
for law enforcement. The role of the City of Los Angeles Human Relations Commission 


Page 1 of 10 











The Los Angeles Framework for 
Countering Violent Extremism 


Developed by the 

Los Angeles Interagency Coordination Group 
In Collaboration with Community Stakeholders 


May 2015 








The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


(City HRC) also provides a unique advantage in Los Angeles. As a neutral entity, City 
HRC provides a space to convene diverse communities and connect needed resources. 
During times of heightened tensions, City HRC plays a vital role in mitigating community 
conflicts and creating new platforms to engage diverse perspectives on challenging 
issues. 

By late 2013, interagency efforts were formalized under an “Interagency Coordination 
Group” (ICG). Based on a foundation that partnerships must extend beyond intra¬ 
agency affiliations, the Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department partnered with the Los 
Angeles Police Department. City HRC, DHS, the United States Attorney’s Office, and 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Working collaboratively with NGO partners, the 
ICG increased coordination and community access to other government networks, 
including the California Department of Justice, United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Service, Orange County Sheriff’s Department, the Transportation Security 
Administration, Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, and the City of Los 
Angeles’s Office of Homeland Security and Public Safety. The ICG will continue to 
expand its network with community stakeholders and government partners in Los 
Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties. 

Collectively, Los Angeles has worked toward developing strong partnerships and 
community trust through robust engagement efforts. These include: 

■ Workshops and training seminars on protective measures for faith-based 
organizations, availability of grants, cultural and religious pluralism, hate 
crimes, domestic violence, civil rights, immigration issues, and consumer 
fraud; 

■ Community town hall meetings and conferences; 

■ Convening faith and community leaders to elicit input regularly, but especially 
in times of crisis; 

■ Community Awareness Briefings (CAB); 

■ Providing asylee and refugee communities with integration resources; and 

■ Engaging with youth and adults at diverse community events. 

While much of the engagement work in Los Angeles takes place at the grassroots level, 
these efforts have strong support from local, state, and federal law enforcement and 
government agencies in the region. This support provides the political will necessary for 
successful interagency collaboration, the development of vibrant community-led 
initiatives, and the effective implementation of the Los Angeles Framework going 
forward. 


Page 2 of 10 










The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


II. Building Healthy Communities 

Community-led initiatives represent a critical layer of programming necessary to 
establish resilient communities. While such programs are largely socially and civic- 
society oriented and not expressly labeled as “CVE,” the outcomes of such programs 
are naturally in line with promoting the resilient and healthy communities. Overall, 
community-driven local programs aim to address challenges around identity formation, 
integration, inter-group relations, political discourse, and social services. Productive 
examples of community-led initiatives include: 

■ Leadership Building and Civic Participation: Several academic efforts 
have taken root in Los Angeles that are tangibly working with young scholars 
and leaders to challenge foreign narratives and to take leadership roles in 
active civic participation. Other organic efforts include grassroots programs 
led by local community groups to provide workshops, training, and seminars 
to build youth participation and enhance skills for civic participation. 

■ Faith-based Partnerships and Coiiaboration: Over 35 interfaith groups 
currently exist in Los Angeles. Some are strictly dialogue-based, while others 
are oriented towards social justice advocacy. These groups focus on bringing 
young professionals of different faiths together to tackle differing perspectives 
while finding common ground to transform how persons from different 
religions relate to each other in the United States. 

■ Social Services Delivery: Organizations play an important role in delivering 
immediate social services both in the immigrant communities, as well as the 
broader local communities. These services are generally provided to the 
neediest segments of society. Programs include refugee services, mental 
health evaluations, family support groups, domestic violence awareness, and 
health clinics. 

■ CVE Awareness initiatives: Local religious scholars and community 
advocacy groups continue to raise awareness and elevate public discourse 
around violent extremism and the dangers of recruitment efforts. Other 
examples include initiatives to provide a grassroots approach to prevention. 

III. Los Angeles Framework: A Conceptual Overview 

The Los Angeles Framework consists of three pillars: prevention, intervention, and 
interdiction. Each of the three components aims to meet community needs while 
mitigating a variety of risk factors. Prevention addresses communal needs and focuses 
on expanding engagement as well as promoting healthy and resilient communities 
through community-driven programs and initiatives. Intervention, or “Off Ramps,” 
focuses on individual needs. The interdiction component addresses security and 
community safety risks. Both prevention and intervention are early mechanisms of risk 
mitigation, whereas interdiction is a mechanism for disrupting criminal threats. 


Page 3 of 10 










The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 



Figure 1: Los Angeles CVE Framework Overview 

IV. Prevention 

Prevention, as intended for this Framework, is defined as collective efforts aimed at 
closing a range of gaps and social openings by which violent extremist ideologies can 
find legitimacy. Prevention strategies aim to build healthy, resilient communities where 
it is more difficult for violent ideologies to take root. Prevention efforts are driven by 
local communities and supported by government partnerships. 



Figure 2: Prevention Components 

Engagement is at the core of prevention efforts and involves a reciprocal relationship 
between community and government. A natural progression of engagement is to 
expand the reach of networks into public/private partnerships as a means of 
strengthening prevention initiatives. The Los Angeles framework is focused on 
advancing community resiliency through expanding engagement efforts while 
ensuring trust and transparency, building networks, and investing in community-driven 
preventative programs. Through consistent engagement and a comprehensive network 
of partners {public, private, and community), preventative programs are the bedrock of 
the Los Angeles Framework. 


Page 4 of 10 












The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


A. Expanding Government/Community Engagement 

Government agencies (local, state, and federal) are at the forefront of engagement 
efforts in Los Angeles. Through community policing and engagement strategies, law 
enforcement agencies have made strides in strengthening trust and building community 
partnerships aimed at effectively addressing community needs and concerns. 

On a broader local level. City HRC plays an active role in advocating for access and 
inclusion of diverse communities, as well as promoting civic participation, pluralism, and 
positive inter-group relations. Local community leaders extend a reciprocal approach 
that makes engagement a two-way dialogue. Through this ongoing dialogue, a 
tremendous amount of learning is exchanged and these exchanges provide a vital 
catalyst for the “whole of government/whole of community” prevention approach in Los 
Angeles. 

Currently identified formats for government-driven engagement include: 


Awareness 


• public forums 

• town halls 

• workshops 

• conferences 

• press conferences 

• participating in and 
cohosting community 
events 


Community Inclusion 


• community working 
groups 

• community advisory 
boards 

• inter-faith events 


Participation of Women 
and Youth 


• young-adult 
engagement and 
leadership programs 

• advisory groups 

• women's ieadership 
programs 


Figure 3: Established Formats for Engagement 

B. Building Networks 

Effective prevention requires strengthening of networks to bolster public, private, and 
grassroots community-based collaboration. “Networks” refer to relationships with key 
partners that can build coalitions, provide vital resources to build capacity, and expand 
the reach of community based programs. Over the past several months, Los Angeles 
has begun to move in the direction of expanding these networks of partners. The 
following are overarching categories of potential partners: 

■ Public Sector: Department of Mental Health, Social and Human Services, 
and educational institutions. Each of these partners can offer direct social 
services as well as training opportunities for CBOs and faith leaders. 


Page 5 of 10 
















The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


■ Private Sector: Private partners, such as social media companies, film 
production and public media outlets. These networks can help amplify 
positive narratives to combat extremism via social media. 

■ CBOs: Connecting local CBO efforts to strengthen inter-organizational 
learning as well as maximize effectiveness of community-led programs. 

■ Funding Sources: Identifying and embracing foundations that can invest in 
CBO capacity building and program delivery methods. 

At this time, Los Angeles is in the early stages of creating sustainable networking 
opportunities between CBOs, the private sector, and foundations. Next steps will 
include a more active effort to facilitate the establishment of community-driven and 
collaborative prevention programming. 

C. Progression of Prevention Components 

Overall, the progression of the prevention components moves from the basics of 
engagement, towards building networks, and then toward collaborative delivery of 
community-driven initiatives. 



Figure 4: Overall Progression of Prevention Components 

The most developed aspects of the prevention strategy for Los Angeles are formal and 
informal engagement initiatives between government and community stakeholders. 
Evidence of success includes; 


■ Delivery of joint activities between government agencies as well as 
community organizations; 

■ Better informed CVE training for law enforcement, emphasizing a community- 
based policing approach and cultural competency; and 


Page 6 of 10 











The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


■ Progress towards community-led initiatives. 

Los Angeles is turning to the next stage of building networks and increasing 
collaborative delivery of community initiatives. Evidence of success includes; 

■ Initial convening of network opportunities; 

■ Willingness from different partners (private and public) to join these efforts; 
and 

■ Initial CBO programming readiness to expand networks of partners and 
collaborate on program delivery. 

The next component of the Los Angeles CVE Framework is an intervention model 
called “Off Ramps ” While still largely in a conceptual stage, a well-developed web of 
community-based networks will provide the core services needed for a successful 
community-based intervention program. 

V. Intervention: “Off-Ramps” 

Stakeholders in Los Angeles, including law enforcement, mental health and social 
service organizations, civic and civil rights organizations, educators, and members of 
inter-faith clergy, are working together to build a comprehensive community-led 
intervention program to mitigate the threat of violent extremism in our communities. 

The Los Angeles CVE Intervention concept, “Off-Ramps,” aims to develop a 
community-led model that leverages the full scope of resources in the greater Los 
Angeles region to help affected individuals. 

Although a formal intervention program does not currently exist, interventions do occur 
by parents, educators, members of clergy, and others when individuals who need help 
are identified. Whereas prevention programs focus on fostering community resiliency to 
nefarious influencers and environments, the intervention program would seek to provide 
individuals, already deemed to be on a path towards violent extremism, with off-ramps 
to needed social services, mental health, faith-based and other services. The ultimate 
purpose of “Off-Ramps” will be to provide rehabilitative care to individuals who are 
moving down a path toward committing illegal activity. 

Outstanding issues include developing: 

■ A reliable analysis and assessment of legal liabilities for interveners; 

■ A more robust inventory of available resources; 

■ Strategies to ensure that concerns about civil rights, civil liberties, and data 
privacy protection are adequately addressed; 

■ Credible research-based baselines for indicators of violent extremism; and 


Page 7 of 10 










The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


■ A mechanism for providing collaborative input into the intervention process 
that avoids securitizing the process, while recognizing potential risks to the 
community and ensuring appropriate mitigation responses are utilized. 

VI. Interdiction 

Interdiction efforts (i.e., investigation, arrest, and potential prosecution) are also an 
important component of the Los Angeles CVE Framework for disrupting crimes 
involving extremist violence and threats to the safety of our communities. The 
interdiction component of the Los Angeles CVE Framework is critical to stopping 
individuals who are intent on committing violence, investigating crimes associated with 
extremist violence, creating an environment where the public feels safe to go about their 
daily lives, and serving as a deterrent to those who may aspire to commit acts of 
violence. 

Equally important to the Los Angeles CVE Framework is developing approaches within 
law enforcement to ensure, whenever appropriate, that alternatives to interdiction are 
maximized and individuals are referred out of the interdiction process and into available 
and viable prevention and intervention components. In doing so, law enforcement can 
more effectively mitigate the risk of individuals becoming potential victims of violent 
extremist recruitment and radicalization and prioritize their resources to focus on 
individuals that are current threats to public safety. 

Protecting Civil Rights and Civil Liberties: A guiding principle of the Los Angeles 
CVE Framework is ensuring that the civil rights and civil liberties of all members of our 
communities are respected. The Attorney General of the United States has created 
guidelines to ensure that investigations are accomplished in a consistent manner across 
the nation and concurrently comply with state and federal laws, as well as the United 
States Constitution. Members of state and local law enforcement agencies are guided 
by similar principles. The Department of Justice and law enforcement agencies play a 
critical role in ensuring that the civil rights and civil liberties of all members of our 
communities are protected and balanced when protecting national security and the 
safety of our communities. 

To ensure the fullest compliance with these principles and the effective use of 
prevention and intervention alternatives, law enforcement agencies work within the Los 
Angeles CVE Framework to promote and reinforce community-oriented policing and 
partnerships, to enhance cultural competency, and to emphasize a “whole of 
government” approach to ensuring community safety and security. Within this 
framework, law enforcement agencies work to better inform the community about law 
enforcement policies in order to promote greater transparency and to dispel 
misunderstandings about law enforcement methods used in interdictions, while also 
educating the public about potential threats to their communities. 


Page 8 of 10 










The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


VII. A Community Perspective 

We all share a unique moment in American history that can yield significant 
advancement on the issues most precious to us and relevant to the protection of our 
communities, cities, and country. Taking advantage of this potential requires a 
respectful and transparent engagement that is built upon and continually reinforces 
trust. 

Issues of Concern: Some community stakeholders have expressed that they feel a 
significant siege upon their rights, place, and brand in the American public square. 
While communities are also keen on countering any justification, religious or otherwise, 
for the actions of terrorists and radicalizing discourse, the atmosphere of fear and 
challenge has caused some to question the legitimacy of the entire premise of CVE 
initiatives. As such, antipathy and opposition toward CVE as a concept has been 
voiced by some civil rights and advocacy groups in Los Angeles and around the 
country. 

As a part of the development of the Los Angeles CVE Framework, every effort was 
made to include a diverse group of voices and to offer opportunities for community 
comment on development of the framework. That process has allowed us to learn a 
great deal about communal perceptions concerning governmental and regional law 
enforcement efforts surrounding CVE. The reluctance among some to engage with law 
enforcement partners rests on negative perceptions of law enforcement and a view that 
law enforcement methods securitize relationships, stigmatize communities, violate 
privacy rights and civil liberties, and constitute a form of spying. 

Community stakeholders believe that it is only through close collaboration with 
community and advocacy groups that these serious civil rights and legal liability 
questions that arise in trying to create comprehensive approaches to phenomena like 
violent extremism can be adequately addressed. The creation of a robust CVE 
framework serves as an important arena for debate, discussion, and dialogue. 

Resources: Community stakeholders have repeatedly articulated the need for 
community-based capacity building in many areas of life. Identifying and increasing 
access to additional resources, grants, and other funding sources to facilitate capacity 
building and support community driven initiatives is one of the priorities of the Los 
Angeles CVE Framework. Community based groups have expressed the need to 
bolster and expand networks to better link faith-based and community organizations 
with local education, mental health, domestic violence prevention, emergency 
management, and health and social services organizations. Increased resources will 
embolden community-led efforts to clarify, discuss, and change research methods, as 


Page 9 of 10 










The Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism 


May 2015 


well as independent oversight procedures, while promoting the development of 
communal goals in the fight against marginalization and exclusion. 

VIII. Challenges Going Forward 

Members of the Interagency Coordination Group and nongovernmental partners who 
have co-constructed the Los Angeles CVE Framework recognize the complexity of this 
undertaking and have identified specific challenges going forward: 

1. Identifying and increasing access to additional resources, grants, and 
other funding sources to facilitate and support capacity-building and community-driven 
initiatives. 

2. Expanding prevention efforts networks within and across neighboring 
counties to ensure continuity and to facilitate a “regional” and “whole of nation” 
approach. 

3. Expanding and enhancing engagement efforts with women and youth so 
that stronger partnerships and leadership can be developed within those groups. 

4. Expanding networks to better link with local education, mental health, 
emergency management, and health and social services organizations. 

5. Addressing the complex legal and liability issues that arise in the context 
of developing intervention models. 

6. Developing capacity for enhanced outreach and social media influence, 
both at a government and community-based level. 

7. Developing better methodologies for effectively measuring the impact of 
CVE outreach, engagement methods, and initiatives. 

8. Addressing community reluctance to engage with government partners, 
including a pervasive grassroots antipathy to the concept of “CVE,” entrenched negative 
perception of law enforcement, and a view that law enforcement methods securitize 
relationships, stigmatize communities, violate privacy rights and civil liberties, and 
constitute a form of spying. 

9. Engaging with the community to clarify and discuss the methods, 
independent oversight procedures, and goals of law enforcement in its fight against 
violent extremism. 

10. Given limited resources, engaging in continuous efforts to counter the 
narrative of extremists, while balancing the need to address day-to-day crime. 

11. Enhancing civic engagement that reaches more grassroots community 
members and not just community leaders. 


Page 10 of 10 










MAYOR'S OFFICE OF PUBLIC SAFETY 



; ; 

Redefining our approach to countering violent extremism 

Under the leadership of Mayor Eric Garcetti, the City of Los Angeles is taking on on innovative public health approach to address 
the root causes of ideologically-motivated violence. The City continues to work within a regional effort including federal, local. 


private sector, and community partners 




y 


Eric 

Garcetti 


#lamayorj 

V 


Resilience: Promote Pluralism & Social Incli 

Prevention 


What is violent extremism? 


;ion 


Intervention Service 



The actions of individuals who 
commit or support the use of 
violence os means to achieve, 
ideological, religious, or political 


Multilayered Strategy: 

The strategy encompasses social resilience, prevention 
and intervention services to meet community and 
individual needs. 


Eorlu Diversion 


r 


gains. 

Our Cornerstones: 

• Bolster youth and young leaders' role in 
informing best practices. 

• Support community-led interventions. 

• Establish a sustainable and culturally 
appropriate network of services. 

• Build within existing operational structures. 

• Leverage expertise of faith leaders, cultural 
organizations, civil rights advocates, social 
workers, academics, mental/public health 
experts, and the private sector among others. 



Network of ^ 
Multidisciplkoy 
Wrap-around 
. Services 






Overall Aim: Promote positive attematives to ideologically 
motivated violence. 


Programmatic Scope: 

• Operates in the social domain (prevention 8 
intervention) 

• Regional with County 8 City operational 
coordinations 

• Multidisciplinary wrap-around services (public 8 
private) 

• Capacity building 8 education 































Community Advisory Group - Current Participants 


Regional Partner 

Overview 

Description of Services 

MPAC (Safe Spaces) 

Safe Spaces is an alternative to both heavy-handed law 
enforcement tactics and government-led countering violent 
extremism (CVE) programs. Rather than accepting the notion 
that the only way to deal with terrorism is through tactics such 
as widespread surveillance and the use of informants, Safe 
Spaces relies on community-led and community-driven 
programs that communities and mosques will benefit from 
beyond the national security context. 

Prevention: Offer healthy outlets and guidance on issues 
ranging from increasing religious knowledge and political 
activism training, to discussing "hot topic" issues like foreign 
policy, gender relations and alcohol/drug abuse. 

Intervention: provide information to help communities 
decide when intervention assistance should be offered. 

King Fahad Mosque 

Mosque and community center in Culver City, CA 

Offers youth programming, offering faith-based services, 
and also play an advisor 

Homeboy Industries 

Homeboy Industries provides hope, training, and support to 
formerly gang-involved and previously incarcerated men and 
women allowing them to redirect their lives and become 
contributing members of our community. 


Not in our Town 

In support of Los Angeles' Developing Resilience goals, NIOT 
will collaborate with city staff and community partners to 
organize and lead several screenings, community dialogues, 
and law enforcement-community roundtable events to help 
spark dialogue and drive action-planning. 

Not In Our Town helps inspire, empower, and connect 
individuals and groups working to counter hate, both online 
and on the ground. 

At community events and screenings, people learn from 
each other about powerful and effective action. 

ILM Foundation 

"ILM Foundation's mission is to teach life skills to economically 
underprivileged youth and adults so that social ills are replaced 
with opportunities for intellectual and economic 
empowerment." 

Humanitarian Day, provides direct services to Los Angeles 

12% homeless in Downtown LA; Go Beyond the G.A.M.E. a 
mentoring program for urban youth; Next Steps Fellowship, 
builds formerly incarcerated men/women's personal 


1 





capacity and provide educational tools for navigating around 
challenges, after release. 


Violence Prevention Coalition 


GRYD 


Since 1991, the VPC has been a leader in the movement to 
frame violence as an issue of public health, rather than criminal 
justice. Members represent public and private organizations, 
including public health, legal community, gun violence 
prevention, domestic violence, probation, law enforcement, 
gang intervention, child abuse prevention, victim support 
services, arts organizations, education organizations, early 
childhood, and youth development, with the understanding 
that only through collaboration can we make Los Angeles a 
safer and healthier place for us all. 


The GRYD Foundation is proud to support the City of Los 
Angeles Mayor's Office of Gang Reduction & Youth 
Development (GRYD Office) in its efforts to reduce gang-related 
violence and to strengthen individuals, families and entire 
communities. 


Through trainings, conferences, workshops, and 
symposiums, the Violence Prevention Coalition seeks to 
identify and share emerging/best practices and support 
networking and cross-field relationship building to maximize 
and amplify members' effectiveness and influence. 
Additionally, we provide a link between individuals, 
community organizations, and policymakers. In so doing we 
are engaged both in the community and on a systemic level 
to reduce/eliminate violence and its effects on the health of 
our communities. 


Summer Night Lights: is a violence reduction strategy which 
provides extended programming at recreation centers and 
parks between the hours of 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. throughout 
the summer months; Tattoo Removal: The GRYD Foundation 
launched a free tattoo removal program to help individuals 
with visible anti-social and/or gang-related tattoos; 
Anonymous Gun Buyback: Led by the City of Los Angeles 
Mayor's Office of Gang Reduction & Youth Development 
(GRYD) in partnership with the Los Angeles Police 
Department (LAPD), the City of Los Angeles Gun Buyback 
initiative rewards the voluntary surrender of firearms while 
also engaging our communities towards a common goal of 
reducing gun violence. 


2 




Professional Community 
Intervention Training Institute 
(PCITI 


The distinguished, award winning and world-renowned 
Professional Community Intervention Training Institute 
(P.C.l.T.I.) was created in late 2006 exclusively as an across the 
board professional "practitioner driven" community based 
gang-outreach intervention, first-responder violence 
deterrence and crisis abatement training institute. Hard-core 
gang intercession, elite personal refinement training-instruction 
and community public safety are its core components. 


In addition to violence and crisis intervention, ABLA-funded 
organizations offer programs to support at-risk youth. 
Supportive programs range from mentorship, to tutoring, 
after-school sports and recreation, "safe-passage" patrol to 
insure that youth can walk safely to and from schools, life 
skills classes, job readiness training, financial literacy classes 
and food distribution services. Through these partnerships, 
ABLA provides support to organizations that help empower 
individuals to rise above adversity and take charge of 
creating positive futures. 


LA Emergency Preparedness 

Foundation 

Access Services 


Established in 1998, Access California Services (AccessCal) is a 
culturally and linguistically sensitive, health and human services 
nonprofit organization in Anaheim, Orange County. AccessCal 
provides social and economic resources to local Arab- and 
Muslim-Americans, refugees and immigrants; however, 
AccessCal is non-sectarian, serving families and individuals of 
any faith or ethnicity. 


With proficiency in over 13 languages, we provide 
employment services, counseling, citizenship and 
immigration services, refugee support services, education, 
healthcare access, and community engagement 
opportunities. 

Tiyya assists all communities of forced displacement, from 
any country or religious background, as long as they reside in 
Orange County and Los Angeles. This falls in line with one of 
the grants goals to develop an approach that does not 
discriminate between communities and can be used in any 
environment. 


Tiyya Foundation 


Tiyya assists all communities of forced displacement, from any 
country or religious background, as long as they reside in 
Orange County and Los Angeles. This falls in line with one of the 
grants goals to develop an approach that does not discriminate 
between communities and can be used in any environment. 


Teaches youth to form strong relationships, appreciate 
teamwork, learn to work with others. Youth also engage in 
activities that enable them to communicate successfully and 
learn to maintain a positive attitude when facing adversity. 


3 




California Sikh Council 

Advocacy group for Sikh American communities 


use Center for Religion and Civic 
Culture 

The use Center for Religion and Civic Culture explores how 
religions change and make change in Southern California and 
across the globe. 

Research: CRCC explores religious developments locally and 
globally from an interdisciplinary perspective 

Training: CRCC leads capacity-building programs for religious 
organizations, civic leaders and government agencies 
Evaluation: CRCC analyzes and assesses initiatives and 
programs focused on faith communities Strategic Consulting: 
CRCC illuminates trends in religion for foundations, 
government agencies and organizations to help them shape 
their strategy and maximize their impact 

City of LA Human Relations 
Commission 

The Human Relations Commission (City HRC) is a neutral agency 
mandated to promote equal participation in the civic process 
through innovative peace building programs and models 
designed to reduce discrimination, increase cultural 
competency and improve inter-group relations. 

Conflict mediation, youth programs, interfaith efforts and 
programming, identify and mitigate public safety issues 


Operotionol Development Committee - Current Participants 


Regional Partner Overview 

Activities 

Mayor's Office of Public Safety 
(convener & facilitator) 



4 







City of Los Angeles Emergency 
Management Department 


County of Los Angeles Emergency 
Management 

County Department of Mental 
Health 


County 211 Referral System 


City of Los Angeles 311 IT A 

Los Angeles Unified School District 

U.S Department of Health and 
Human Services (SAMHSA/OPPI) 


The Emergency Management Department has four divisions 
comprised of administrative staff and specialists that work 
with City departments, municipalities and an array of 
community-based organizations to ensure that the City and its 
residents have the resources and information they need to 
prepare, respond and recover from emergencies, disasters and 
significant events. 

Devises plans and coordinates departmental emergency 
services 


The LA County Department of Mental Health works with 
stakeholders and community partners to provide clinically 
competent, culturally sensitive and linguistically appropriate 
mental health services to clients in the least restrictive setting. 

Nationwide service for locating resources administered by 
United Way 


2"“^ largest public school system in the United States 

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. 
Department of Health and Human Services that leads public 
health efforts to advance the behavioral health of the nation. 
SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse 
and mental illness on America's communities. 


Mental health services provided include assessments, case 
management, crisis intervention, medication support, peer 
support and other rehabilitative services. Assist more than 
250,000 individuals every year. 

Food, disaster relief, crisis assistance, housing, jobs, veterans 
support, etc. 


The Office of Policy, Planning, and Innovation provides an 
integrated and structured approach for the identification and 
adoption of policies and innovative practices that improve 
behavioral health services outcomes. 


5 




Bay an Claremont University 


Bayan Claremont is a graduate institution educating the next 
generation of American Muslim faith leaders "who will 
positively serve the needs of the Islamic community in the 
religious and cultural pluralism of North American societies." 
Bayan offers masters and doctorate level degrees in various 
fields of Islamic studies. 


Masters and Doctoral Level Programs in Islamic Studies: 
Islamic Studies, Islamic Education (for Educators), and Islamic 
Chaplaincy; Degree Courses for Audit; Youth Director 
Training; 


Interagency Coordination Group (ICG) - Outreach Coordination 


Regional Partner Overview Activities 

Coordinate and promote outreach and relationship building with communities 
Los Angeles Sherriff's Department to expand knowledge and learning as well as support regional CVE activities. 

(convener & facilitator) 

City of LA Mayor's Office 


6 







DHS - LA Regional Office of 

Strategic Engagement 

Los Angeles Police Department 

Orange County Sheriffs 

Department 

San Bernardino Sherriffs 

Department 

FBI 

USAO 

USCIS 


Additional Partners & Private Sector 

Regional Partners 

Overview 

Activities 

FilmZFuture 

Provides technical skills building to a select cohort of high school students 
interested in pursuing career paths in the entertainment industry. Moreover, 
F2F offers young people a dynamic medium to affect positive changes, 
promote core values of pluralism, and influence critical social challenges 
through film and social media 

Partnered with Emerson College of LA, City of 

LA FIRC, and Flaven Entertainment (prod, for 

TBS and Comedy Central) 

EdVenture Partners (P2P) 

University students from around the world develop and execute campaigns 
and social media strategies against extremism that are credible, authentic, 
and believable to their peers and resonate within their communities 
sponsored by Facebook and U.S. Department of State 

Young people receive funding to create real 
campaigns which are measured to have impact 
on their communities, strategically targeting 
audiences and evaluating for effectiveness. 

RAND 

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy 
and decision-making through research and analysis. 

RAND disseminates its research findings as 
widely as possible to benefit the public good. 


7 









More than 20,000 RAND publications and 
commentary are available for free at 
www.rand.org. 


8 




Multidisciplinary Regional Steering Committee Coordination 

“Off Ramps-LA” 


The City of LA in collaboration with the L.A Regional DHS Office of Community Partnerships is 
coordinating a regional multidisciplinary steering committee. The Steering Committee aims to 
establish a responsive public health approach to ideologically motivated violence. Foundational to 
the development is an organic community-led programing throughout the greater LA area. The 
Steering Committee is composed of three functioning sub-committees: 



1- Operational Developments : Overall purpose is to define protocols within current operational 
structures to ensure sustainability. 

Goals: (1) Develop multifaceted referral systems, (2) Define assessment protocols; (3) Connect network 
of government services to support grassroots and community driven interventions 

Partners: Mayor's Office of Public Safety {convener & facilitator), City of Los Angeles Emergency 
Management Department, County of Los Angeles Emergency Management, County Department of 
Mental Health, County 211 Referral System, City of Los Angeles 311 ITA, Los Angeles Unified School 
District, U.S Department of Health and Human Services (SAMHSA/OPPI), and Bayan Claremont 
University. 

2- Community Advisory Committee: Overall purpose is to inform operational designs that are well 
suited to foster grassroots prevention - intervention programs. 

Goals: (1) augment learning and knowledge among CBOs, (2) link CBOs and expand support systems 
of culturally appropriate interventions / prevention options, (3) network of grassroots interventions. 

Partners: Mayor's Office of Public Safety (convener & facilitator) MPAC, King Fahad Mosque, 
Homeboy Industries, Not in our Town, ILM Foundation, Violence Prevention Coalition, CAIR, GRYD, 
HSAC, Professional Community Intervention Training Institute (PCITI), LA Emergency Preparedness 
Foundation, Access Services, Tiyya Foundation, California Sick Council, City of L.A Human Relations 
Commission, and USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture. 













3- Interagency Coordination Collaborative (ICG) : Regional (local and federal) law enforcement 
coordination of community outreach & engagement. 

Goals: (1) Strengthen community relationships and access to Law Enforcement, (2) contribute to a 
regionally informed intervention operational developments and coordination. 

Partners: Los Angeles Sherriffs Department (convener & facilitator). City of LA Mayor's Office, Los 
Angeles Police Department, Orange County Sheriff's Department, San Bernardino Sherriffs 
Department, DHS, FBI, USAOS and USCIS. 


Evaluation Team: DHS has funded an evaluation team led by Dr. Steve Weine University of Illinois at 
Chicago and UCLA School of Public Health for evaluations. 

In addition, City of Los Angles is partnering with RAND for additional evaluation of impact for grant 
proposal. 




Joumana Silyan-Saba 

■ • (b) (6) 


SUMMARY 

Director of Strategies against Violent Extremism (SAVE), Mayor’s Office of Public Safety. 
Served as a Senior Policy Analyst for the City of Los Angeles Human Relations Commission. 
Experienced in mitigating tensions, managing community-government relations, and advising on 
relevant policy issues. Over ten years experience in facilitation, mediation techniques and inter¬ 
group relations both in government and in nonprofit settings. Eeatured expert speaker in media 
as well as national and international conferences; including most recently a panel presentation 
with presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Mayor Eric Garcetti, as well as a briefing for 
Vice President Biden. Instruct Master’s candidates in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution & 
Peacebuilding at CSUDH. Eluent with Arabic language and culture. 

EDUCATION 

CALIEORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY DOMINGUEZ HILLS 
M.A. Behavioral Science; Negotiation and Conflict Management, 2002 

CALIEORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY LONG BEACH 

B.S. Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement with a Minor in Business Administration, Human 
Resources Management, 1997 

Certified State of California mediator 

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 

CITY OF LOS ANGELES, MAYOR’S OFFICE OF PUBLIC SAFETY 

Director, CVE Strategy Development March 2016 - Present 

Responsible for development and implementation of strategies against violent extremism. 
Working with local and federal partners to create sustainable prevention and intervention 
programs aimed at building alternatives to ideologically motivated violence. 

CITY OF LOS ANGELES HUMAN RELTAIONS COMMISSION 

Human Relations Senior Policy Analyst July 2011 - March 2016 

Engage faith and civic leaders, civil rights organizations, and academic institutions to promote 
civic participation and provide policy recommendations relevant to violent extremism, religious 
freedom protections, discrimination among others. Through this work I accomplished the 
following; 






• Spearheaded a number of collaborative partnerships with local and federal government 
agencies, educational institutions, nonprofit organizations, private sector, and community 
groups to effectively address expressed community needs. 

• Designed community outreach and education program with the Los Angeles Police 
Department Inspector General to address controversial uses of forces and constitutional 
policing issues. 

• Assisted in facilitating and constructing the Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) E.A. 
Eramework design, which was selected by the White House as one of the most developed 
in the nation. The framework was highlighted during the Eebruary 2015 White House 
Summit on CVE. 

• Created public platforms to engage public discourse on a variety of difficult social issues 
including a series on Women in Peace Building and Social Justice, Religious Pluralism, 
Same Sex Marriage (prop 8), and other topics. 

• Served on local, national and international panels on topics related to conflict 
management, cultural competency, civic engagement and government relations. 

• Trained international organizations and foreign government representatives on topics 
relating to governance of diverse communities, integration, as well as civic participation. 
Visiting countries included: China, Israel-Palestine, Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq, Australia, 
Germany, Indonesia, Burma, Turkey, and Latin America among others. 

• Produced media releases and TV segments aired on Channel 35 (CityView). 


Human Relations Advocate August 2005 - July 2011 

Initiated innovative internal operational structure and design for field assessment tools and 
helped improved conflict management knowledge and awareness by providing specialized 
training, curriculum designs, and delivery within City departments, including Department of 
Neighborhood Empowerment, Public Works, as well as to EAUSD teachers, administrators, and 
parents. Significant undertaking also included: 

• Served as a neutral monitor oversight to the formation of Neighborhood Councils, 
elections, and acted as the Einal Decision-Maker (EDM) for several contested 
Neighborhood Council elections, which entailed research, investigation, as well as 
writing the final EDM report with accordance to the bylaws and election procedures. 

• Managed community efforts and prevention programs designed to reduce violence and 
tensions and linked resources across agencies including the Eos Angeles Police 
Department (EAPD) / Eos Angeles Unified School District (EAUSD) Mentor Program, 
and Youth Civic Engagement Collaborative. 



• Served on various collaboratives and committees including West Side Gang Task Force, 
Crenshaw Doresy collaborative, LAPD Mentor Program, as well as DONE/Mayor’s 
Youth Civic Engagement among others. 

• Designed and implement conflict management youth programming on various high and 
middle school campuses including peer mediations, and other programs that promote 
positive school culture. 


CAEIEORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY DOMINGUEZ HILLS, Carson, CA 

Adjunct Assistant Professor September 2007 - Present 

Develop instructions for Master’s candidates (on-line courses) for the Negotiation, Conflict 
Resolution & Peacebuilding Graduate Program including syllabi, lesson plans, lectures, 
assignments, and grading scales. 

ASIAN PACIEIC AMERICAN DISPUTE RESOLUTION CENTER Los Angeles, CA 

Community and Inter-group Conflicts Program Director August 2003 - August 2005 

Supervised all operations ineluding full-time staff, interns, grant compliance, as well as day to day 
functions and case management of conciliations and mediations, which resulted in: 

• Increased compliance with County grant terms and requirements to 100%. 

• 50% increase in the number of incoming conciliation / mediation cases, which translated 
to repeat county funding. 

• Increased training delivery to over 250 hours of community mediations training annually. 

• Expanded partnerships with government agencies, educational institutions, and other non-profit 
organizations, resulting in increase of in-kind services to supplement funding. 

COMMITTEES & ADVISORY BOARDS 


• Los Angeles Interagency Collaborative Group, (ICG) (2008 - current) 

• Los Angeles Police Department Professional Advisory Committee (PAC) (2012 - 2016) 

• NewGround: A Jewish-Muslim Partnership for Change Advisory Board (2012 - 2016) 

• Future45, USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, Advisory Board (2014 - 2015) 

MEDIA APPEARANCES 


Andrea Mitchell, interview, MSNBC, Washington DC, February 19, 2015, “Countering Violent 
Extremism https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=em-upload owner&v=ldSSRrFN 8E 

La Opinion, “Masacre en San Bernardino: iPistoleros iban por judio?” (quoted in article 
December 8, 2015) 

The Wall Street Journal, “U.S. Muslim Community Divided Over White House Outreach Plan" 
(quoted in article April 20, 2015) 





Desert News, "'Religious unity: Los Angeles gathers faith leaders to make peace over Prop 8, 
other volatile issues'" (quoted in article March 16, 2013) 


PUBLICATIONS 


2015. "Pathways to Partnership: The Los Angeles Human Relations Commission and Google LA 
Coproduction of Youth Capacity" (Dr. Brian Calfano, with Joumana Silyan-Saba and Sheldon 
Cruz) In Creative Government and Business Alliances: A Public Solutions Handbook, Daniel 
Bromberg (ed.). ME Sharpe. 

2012. "Government Community Engagement Methods: City of Los Angeles Case Study", Journal 
of The Moroccan Interdisciplinary Center for Strategic and International Studies (CMIESI). 
Also reposted at CSUDH e-joumal at: http://www.eiournalncrp.org/govemment-community- 
engagement-methods-city-of-los-angeles-case-studv/ 


CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS (Selected Samples) 

• Invited to speak at the Homeland Security Round Table moderated by presidential candidate 
Hillary Clinton and City of Eos Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti - March 2016 

• Invited to present at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine on role 
of public health in countering violent extremism - Eebruary 2016 (Washington, DC). 

• Invited to present at the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism. Briefed 
Vice President Biden on the Eos Angeles CVE Eramework - Eebruary, 2015 (Washington, 
DC). 

• Invited to moderate a panel at the Police Oversight Investigation Training and Symposium 
hosted by the LAPD Inspector General’s Office - Eebruary, 2015 (Eos Angeles, CA) 

• Invited to present at the Women’s Leadership Conference at Mount St. Mary’s College - 
September, 2014 (Los Angeles, CA). 

• Invited to present at the National Summit on Empowering Communities at the Eederal Law 
Enforcement Training Center - August, 2014 (Atlanta, GA). 

• Invited to present at the National Homeland Security Conference on Preventing Homegrown 
Violent Extremism in Educational Institutions - April, 2013 (Los Angeles, CA). 

• Invited by California State Dominguez Hills University to present on Understanding the 
Syrian Conflict as it Relates to American National Interests - September, 2013 (Carson, CA). 

• Invited to present at the International Visitors Council of Los Angeles (IVCLA) as a 
panelists on Building Inclusive Societies - September, 2013 (Los Angeles, CA). 

• Invited to participate and present at the LAPD National Training Model / CVE Training 
Launch - January, 2012 (San Diego, CA). 

• Invited to moderate CVE - Community Engagement workshops at the LAPD 2012 LinCT 
International Conference - April, 2012 (Los Angeles, CA) 

• Invited by USAO & EBI to moderate Interagency Hate Crimes Eorum - April, 2012 (Los 
Angeles, CA). 






















• Invited to participate and present at the Fez International Conference at the Moroccan Center 
for Interdisciplinary Strategic and International Studies on the topic of Investing in the 
Human Capital: Youth Focus - December, 2012 (Fez, Morocco). 


REFERENCES 

Provided upon request. 



BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES IN LOS ANGELES 


LETTERS OF SUPPORT SUBMITTED BY 
THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES 
OFFICE OF MAYOR ERIC GARCETTI 
MAYOR’S OFFICE OF PUBLIC SAFETY 



211 LA COUNTY 


2ii : 


LA COUNTY 


INFORMATION AND REFERRAL FEDERATION OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY 
Serving Los Angeles County since 1981 


August 31, 2016 

Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 


I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor's Office of Public Safety and the regional 
partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and the Regional 
Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to 
Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the 
design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programming. 
We agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of 
community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor's Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real difference 
to better assist the Los Angeies region in supporting our communities to pursue shared 
solutions that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, 
piay, and connect. 


Sincerely,^" ^ ^ 


(b)(6) 


Maribel Marin 
Executive Director 
211 LA County 


526 W. Las Tunas Drive, San Gabriel, California 91776 • PHONE 626.350.1841 • FAX 626.442.6940 

WVVW.21 1 LACounty.org 






AHMADIYYA 
MUSLIM COMMUNITY 

United States of America 



Muslims who believe in the Messiah, 
Mirza Ghulam Ahnuu.1 Qadiani". 


September 1, 2016 

To Whom It May Concern: 

We write to express om support for the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety (OPS) 
and its efforts to address individual and community needs to reduce ideologically motivated 
violence in Greater Los Angeles area. 

The Mayor’s OPS is developing an innovative approach to coimtering violent extremism 
(CVE) by improving interagency commimication throughout goverimient and building resilient 
networks with commimity groups and partners. Historically, NGOs have faced significant 
hiu'dles in self-initiating CVE measmes, including resoiuce constraints, knowledge gaps, and 
the imderdevelopment of peer-to-peer networks. Fruthennore, specific efforts to put CVE 
practicing NGOs in touch with one another to share information and best practices have not 
been effective. 

Upon several rormds of discussion with interfaith leadership groups and community advisory 
committees, one of the key concerns raised was the lack of systematized coordination among 
community organizations and actors that could maximize the coverage and effectiveness of 
resilience-building, prevention, and intervention efforts, hr other words, organizations of 
diverse strengths and capabilities were often rmaware of how a potential partner could 
complement then own activities and expand the capabilities and services offered to then 
respective constituencies. We reached a ftmdameutal conclusion: there is a critical need for 
streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of community- 
driven CVE efforts in order to achieve gains m all areas. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means 
of fostering coordination and cooperation among commrmity-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the commimity-led sirpport system for conmiimities and individirals. 

Sincerely, 


(b) (6) 


Amjad Mahmood Klian 

National Duector of Public Affaus 

Ahmadiyya Mirslim Commimity USA 

cc: Los Angeles Area Chapter Presidents of Ahmadiyya Mirslim Commimity USA 


15000 Good Hope Road, Silver Spring, MD 20905 
phone: 301-879-0110 6x: 301-879-0115 tAivw ahmadiyya us 1-800-Why-Islam 







Ba/an Claremont 
Islamic Graduate School 
1325 North College Avenue 
aafemontCA9l7l I 
(909) 447-6347 
bayanclciremontorg 

August 30, 2016 

Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Depailment of Homeland Seciu ity 
245 Mimay Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 

I write m strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the 
regional partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and 
the Regional Steering Committee in then grant proposal and efforts to develop an 
innovative approach to Coimtering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to 
the design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and inteiwention 
progi aming. We agree that sti eamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously 
expandmg network of commimity-diiven efforts is the best way forwar d in order to 
achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to oiu' efforts is the firll sirpport of commimity-led initiatives that are intended to 
meet individiral and commimity needs. Om agency will continire to offer its in-kind 
sirpport for corrmiimity-based organizations to ensiue then sirccess. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective 
means of fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, 
creating cohesive goals and messagmg, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing 
among groups and identifying gaps in the commimity-led support system for 
commimities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local 
dialogue about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will 
make a real difference to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our 
communities to pursue shared solutions that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and 
the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and connect. 


Sincerely, 


(b)(6) 


Jihad Tmk, President 
Bayan Claremont 






SACHI A. HAMAI 
Chief Executive Office 


County of Los Angeles 
Chief Executive Office 

Office of Emergency Management 

1275 North Eastern Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 90063 
(323) 980-2260 
http://lacoa.ora 



JEFF L REEB 
Director 

LESLiE LUKE 
Deputy Director 


September 2, 2016 


Honorable Jeh Johnson 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 

Dear Honorable Jeh Johnson: 

I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the 
regional partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and 
the Regional Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an 
innovative approach to Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

From an Emergency Management perspective, working in the community before an event 
can help reduce the impacts of an event as seen across the Country this year. Partnering 
with emergency management allows us to discuss the consequence management of 
working with our local communities. As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue 
to work together to contribute to the design and implementation of the appropriate CVE 
prevention and intervention programing. We agree that streamlined, systematic 
coordination of a continuously expanding network of community-driven efforts is the best 
way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective 
means of fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, 
creating cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing 
among groups and identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities 
and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real 
difference to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue 
shared solutions that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place 
to live, work, play, and connect. 





Honorable Jeh Johnson 
September 2, 2016 
Page 2 


If you h ave any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at 
email at 


(b) (6) 


or via 


(b) (6) 


Respectfully, 

I X7) 


w) 


LESLIE LUKE, Deputy Director 
Office of Emergency Management 





ARAM SAHAKIAN 
GENERAL MANAGER 


CITY OF LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 



ERIC GARCETTI 

MAYOR 


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 
DEPARTMENT 

200 N SPRING STREET. ROOM 1533 
LOS ANGELES. CA 90012 
TEL (213)978-2222 
TEL (213)484-4800 
FAX (213)978-0517 
www.emergency.lacity org 


September 1,2016 

The Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane SW 
Washington, DC 20528 


Dear Secretary Johnson: 

I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the regional 
partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and the Regional 
Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to 
Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the 
design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programming. 
We agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of 
community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 


We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups 
and identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 


The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real 
difference to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue 
shared solutions that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to 
live, work, play, ancLdbhnect. 



Sincdrejy 


SAHAK 
Gener^-Manac 



IAN 
lanager 


AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY - AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER 





►►FILM FUTURE 

September 1.2016 

The Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary of Homeland Security 
Washington. DC 20528 

Dear Mr. Johnson; 

I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor's Office of Public Safety and the regional 
partners including Department of Mental Health. Interagency Collaborative and the Regional 
Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to 
Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the 
design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programing. Wc 
agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of 
community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor's Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically impK^rtant national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real difference 
to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions 
that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and 
connect. 

Very truly yours. 


(b) (6) 


Rachel Miller 
founder 


"Art is not what yon see. hut what yon make others see^ Edgar Degas 

►►FF 


Face hook: <Q>Filin2Fiinire 


Instagram: @FilmlFiiture 


Twitter: <S FilmlFiiture 





September 2, 2016 



INDUSTRIES 


Honorable Jeh Johnson 

Secretary US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 


Board of Directors 

John Brady, Chair 
Javier Angulo 
Sean Arian 

Father Gregory Boyle, SJ. 
James A. Burk 
Rosa Campos 
Alex Choves, Sr. 

Rick Creed 
Allot) Deck 

Renee Delphin-Rodriguez 
Oscar Gonzales 
J. Michael Hennigan 
Darrell Huntley 
Bruce Karatz 
Christine Lynch 
Mercedes Martinez 
Viktor Rzeteljski 
Rob Smith 
Alan Smolinisky 
Elizabeth Stephenson 
Carlos Vosquez 
Chris Weitz 
Joseph J. Ybarra 


I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor's Office of Public Safety and 
the regional partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency 
Collaborative and the Regional Steering Committee in their grant proposal and 
efforts to develop an innovative approach to Countering Violent Extremism 
(CVE) in Los Angeles. 

Homeboy Industries provides hope, training, and support to formerly gang- 
involved and previously incarcerated men and women allowing them to 
redirect their lives and become contributing members of our community. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to 
contribute to the design and implementation of the appropriate CVE 
prevention and intervention programing. We agree that streamlined, 
systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of community- 
driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are 
intended to meet individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to 
offer its in-kind support for community-based organizations to ensure their 
success. 


We view the effort led by the Mayor's Office of Public Safety to be the most 
effective means of fostering coordination and cooperation among community- 
based organizations, creating cohesive goais and messaging, promoting 
knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and identifying gaps in the 
community-led support system for communities and individuals. 


The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and 
local dialogue about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed 
funding will make a real difference to better assist the Los Angeles region in 
supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions that are crucial to our 
safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and 
connect. 



Dir^toi of External Affairs 



Hope has an address 

130 West Bruno Street, Los Angeles, California 90012 • 323.526.1254 • 


Homeboylndustries.org 




City of Los Angeles 

COMMISSIONERS 

Rosa Russell, President 
Caspar Rtvera-Salgado.Ph.D.. Vice-President 
Mark Rothman, 2"“ Vice-President 

Nirinjan Singh Khalsa 
Leni I. Boorstin 
Daniel Camposton 
Courtney Morgan-Greene 
James Herr 
Irene Tovar 

Melany DelaCruz-Viesca 


To Whom it May Concern, 

This letter is in support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s OfSce of Public Safety and it’s eferts to address individual 
and community needs to reduce ideobgically motivated violence in Greater Los Angeles area. 

The Mayor’s Office of Public Safety is devetoping an innovative approach to Countering Violent Extremism 
(CVE), by improving interagency communication throu^ut government and building resilient networks with 
community groups and partners. Historically, NGOs have feced significant hurdles in self-initiating CVE 
measures, including resource constraints, knowledge gaps, and the underdevelopment of peer-to-peer 
networks. Furthermore, specific efiorts to put CVE practicing NGOs in touch with one another to share 
information and best practices have not been effective. 

Upon several rounds of discussion with interfaith leadership groups and community advisory committees, one 
of the key concerns raised was the lack of s>'steraati 2 ed coordination among community organizations and 
actors that could maximize the coverage and effectiveness of resilience-building, prevention, and intervention 
efforts. In other words, organizations of diverse strengths and capabilities were often unaware of how a 
potential partner could complement their own activities and expand the capabilities and services offered to 
their respective constituencies. We reached a fundamental conclusion: there is a critical need for streamlined, 
systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of community-driven CVE efforts in order to 
achieve gains in all areas. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of fostering 
coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating cohesive goals and messaging, 
promoting knowledge and capabflity-sharing among groups and identifying gaps in the community-led siqjport 
system for communities and individuals. 


California 


Housing + Community 
Investment Department 



Human Relations Commission 

1200 West 7th St., 9th Poor 
Los Angeles, CA 90017 

Executive Director: Patricia M. Villasenor 
E-mail: patricla. v illasenor(^acity org 


ERIC GARCETTI 



Executive Director 

City of Los Angeles Human Relations Commission 


City HRC 

"Reducing Tensions...Creating Connections...Building Peace’ 







Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 


I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the regional 
partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and the Regional 
Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to 
Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the 
design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programing. We 
agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of 
community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real difference 
to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions 
that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and 
connect. 


Sincerely, 


mm 


Mahomed Khan 

Director Interfaith And Outreach 
King Fahad Mosque. Culver City, CA. 

Muslim Chaplin 

Los Angeles County Men's Central Jail. 





EdVenture Partners 


September 2, 2016 

Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 

I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the 
regional partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and 
the Regional Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an 
innovative approach to Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to 
the design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention 
programing. We agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously 
expanding network of community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to 
achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to 
meet individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind 
support for community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective 
means of fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based 
organizations, creating cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and 
capability-sharing among groups and identifying gaps in the community-led support 
system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local 
dialogue about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make 
a real difference to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities 
to pursue shared solutions that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of 
prosperous place to live, work, play, and connect. 

Sincerely, 


(b) (6) 


Tony Sgro 
CEO & Founder 
EdVenture Partner 







iMtthW 



LOS ANGELES 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
FOUNDATION 


350 South Figueroa Street, Suite 437, Los Angeles, CA 90071-1205 

www.LAEPF.org 


Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 

I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor's Office of Public Safety and the regional partners 
including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and the Regional Steering Committee 
in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to Countering Violent Extremism 
(CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the design and 
implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programing. We agree that 
streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of community-driven efforts 
is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet individual 
and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for community-based 
organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor's Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of fostering 
coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating cohesive goals and 
messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and identifying gaps in the 
community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue about 
countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real difference to better assist 
the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions that are crucial to our 
safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and connect. 


Sincerely, 

Los Angeles Emergency Preparedness Foundation 


(b) (6) 


Brent Woodworth 
President & CEO 
Brent.Woodworth(a LAEPF.org 






LOS ANGELES POLICE DEPARTMENT 







P. 0. Box 30158 

CHARLIE BECK 


Los Angeles, Calif. 90030 

Chief of Police 


Telephone: (213)486-0150 


TDD: (877) 275-5273 


Eric Garcetti 

Ref #: 1.1 


September 6, 2016 


Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington, DC 20528 


Dear Secretary Johnson, 

I write in support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and its efforts to address 
the social aspects of individual and community needs to reduce ideologically motivated violence 
in the Greater Los Angeles area. 

The Mayor’s Office of Public Safety is developing an innovative approach to Countering Violent 
Extremism (CVE), by improving interagency communication throughout government and 
building resilient networks with community groups and partners. Historically, community based 
organizations (CBOs) have faced significant hurdles in self-initiating CVE measures, including 
resource constraints, knowledge gaps, and the underdevelopment of peer-to-pccr networks. 
Furthermore, specific efforts to put CVE practicing CBOs in touch with one another to share 
information and best practices have not been effective. 

The City of Los Angeles and the surrounding region are complex; and a holistic and 
comprehensive approach to CVE prevention and intervention must be multi-faceted to effectively 
address the diverse needs of the region and the complexities of constructive CVE intervention. 
The proposal put forth by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety operates and complements other 
CVE prevention, resilience and mental health services, and is one critical piece of an overall 
effective, coordinated, and comprehensive CVE strategy. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be an effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating cohesive 
goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and identifying 
gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals in the pre-criminal 
space. 

Very truly yours. 


Iibi (61 




Chief of Police 


AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 
www.LAPDonline.org 
www.joinLAPD.com 



31 August 2016 


Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 


I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor's Office of Public Safety and the regional 
partners including Department of Mental Health. Interagency Collaborative and the Regional 
Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to 
Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the... 
design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programing. We 
agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of 
community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor's Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability'-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real difference 
to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions 
that are crucial to our safety. liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live. work. play, and 
connect. 


Sincerelv. 



Salam Al-Marayati 
Muslim Public Affairs Council 









PO Box 70232 
Oakland, California 94612 

TEL 510.268.9675 
FAX 510.268.3606 

www.niot.org 


September 2. 2016 

Honorable Jeh C. .lohnson 
Seeretar)' 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC. 20528 


1 write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Otfice of Public Safety and the regional 
partners including Department of Mental Health. Interagency Collaborative and the Regional 
Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to 
Countering Violent E.xtremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, wc will continue to work together to contribute to the 
design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programing. We 
agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of 
community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor's Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving lite. 1 he proposed funding will make a real difference 
to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions 
that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and 
connect. 


Sincerely, 


lib' 161 


( Harold Leltal, Jr. U 
Executive Director 

Not In Our Town/ The Working Group 


A Project of The Working Group 







PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITY INTERVENTION TRAINING INSTITUTE 


8-29-2016 

Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 


I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the regional partners 
including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and the Regional Steering Committee 
in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to Countering Violent Extremism 
(CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the design and 
implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programing. We agree that 
streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of community-driven efforts is 
the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet individual and 
community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for community-based 
organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of fostering 
coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating cohesive goals and 
messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and identifying gaps in the 
community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue about 
countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real difference to better assist 
the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions that are crucial to our 
safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and connect. 


Sincerely, 

Aquil Basheer 

Creator & Founder: 

The Professional Community Intervention Training In s titute 


1409 W. Vernon Ave. Los Angeles, CA. 90062 (800) 926-2155 Off. 
Pciti.net 


D 

S 


violence 

prevention 

coalition 


greoter 
lo/ Qngele/ 


1000 North Alameda Street 
Suite 240 
Los Angeles, CA 90012 
0 213.346.3265 
f 213.808.1009 

www.vpcgla.org 


steering committee 

Adriana E. Molina, LMFT, Chair 
Children's Institute, Inc. 

Adela Barajas, Vice Chair 
Life After Uncivil Ruthless Acts 

Jerry Factor, Treasurer 
Factor Family Foundation 

Holly Bridges Shapira 
Picture Alternatives 

Gale Feldman, MPH, Past-Chair 
FMA Community Health Consulting 

Billie Weiss, MPH, Founder 
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health 


leadership team 

Adrienne Lamar Snider 
Executive Director 

Daniel Healy, MPH 
Associate Director 


September 1,2016 


To Whom it May Concern, 

This letter is in support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Offiee of Public Safety 
and it’s efforts to address individual and community needs to reduce 
ideologieally motivated violenee in Greater Los Angeles area. 

The Mayor’s Office of Public Safety is developing an innovative approach 
to Countering Violent Extremism (CVE), by improving interagency 
communication throughout government and building resilient networks with 
community groups and partners. Historieally, NGOs have faced significant 
hurdles in self-initiating CVE measures, including resource constraints, 
knowledge gaps, and the underdevelopment of peer-to-peer networks. 
Furthermore, specific efforts to put CVE practicing NGOs in touch with one 
another to share information and best practices have not been effective. 

Upon several rounds of discussion with interfaith leadership groups and 
community advisory committees, one of the key concerns raised was the 
laek of systematized coordination among community organizations and 
actors that could maximize the coverage and effectiveness of resilience¬ 
building, prevention, and intervention efforts. In other words, organizations 
of diverse strengths and capabilities were often unaware of how a potential 
partner eould complement their own activities and expand the capabilities 
and services offered to their respeetive constituencies. We reached a 
fundamental conclusion; there is a critical need for streamlined, systematic 
coordination of a continuously expanding network of community-driven 
CVE efforts in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the 
most effective means of fostering coordination and cooperation among 
community-based organizations, creating cohesive goals and messaging, 
promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and identifying 
gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

Sincerely, 

Violence Prevention Coalition of Greater Los Angeles 
Peace, 


(b) (6) 


Adrienne Lamar Snider 
Executive Director 


A project of 
community partners 




|VN CALIFORNIA 
QQ SIKH 
■ W COUNCIL 


P.O. Box 193 Beverly Hills, CA 90213 
(424) 288-4935 

September 1, 2016 

To Whom it May Concern, 

This letter is in support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and its efforts to 
address individual and community needs to reduce ideologically motivated violence in Greater 
Los Angeles area. 

The Mayor’s Office of Public Safety is developing an innovative approach to Countering Violent 
Extremism (CVE), by improving interagency communication throughout government and 
building resilient networks with community groups and partners. Historically, NGOs have faced 
significant hurdles in self-initiating CVE measures, including resource constraints, knowledge 
gaps, and the underdevelopment of peer-to-peer networks. Eurthermore, specific efforts to put 
CVE practicing NGOs in touch with one another to share information and best practices have not 
been effective. 

Upon several rounds of discussion with interfaith leadership groups and community advisory 
committees, one of the key concerns raised was the lack of systematized coordination among 
community organizations and actors that could maximize the coverage and effectiveness of 
resilience-building, prevention, and intervention efforts. In other words, organizations of diverse 
strengths and capabilities were often unaware of how a potential partner could complement their 
own activities and expand the capabilities and services offered to their respective constituencies. 
We reached a fundamental conclusion: there is a critical need for streamlined, systematic 
coordination of a continuously expanding network of community-driven CVE efforts in order to 
achieve gains in all areas. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

Sincerely, 


(b) (6) 


Nirinjan Singh Khalsa 
Executive Director 
California Sikh Council 






ILM 



FOUNDATION 


INTELLECT • LOVE • MERCY 


Humanitarian Day | Go Beyond the G.A.M.E | Sociai Empowerment Educationai Deveiopment 


Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 


I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the 
regional partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and 
the Regional Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an 
innovative approach to Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to 
the design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention 
programing. We agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously 
expanding network of community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to 
achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to 
meet individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind 
support for community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective 
means of fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, 
creating cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing 
among groups and identifying gaps in the community-led support system for 
communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local 
dialogue about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make 
a real difference to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to 
pursue shared solutions that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of 
prosperous place to live, work, play, and connect. 


Sincerely, 

Systems for Human Empowerment 


P.O. Box 93789 Pasadena, CA 91109 | hd@ilmercy.com | www.humanitarianday.com 




Honorable Jeh Johnson 
Secretary 

US Department of Homeland Security 
245 Murray Lane 
Washington DC, 2052 


I write in strong support of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and the regional 
partners including Department of Mental Health, Interagency Collaborative and the Regional 
Steering Committee in their grant proposal and efforts to develop an innovative approach to 
Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Los Angeles. 

As part of the regional collaborative, we will continue to work together to contribute to the 
design and implementation of the appropriate CVE prevention and intervention programing. We 
agree that streamlined, systematic coordination of a continuously expanding network of 
community-driven efforts is the best way forward in order to achieve gains in all areas. 

Key to our efforts is the full support of community-led initiatives that are intended to meet 
individual and community needs. Our agency will continue to offer its in-kind support for 
community-based organizations to ensure their success. 

We view the effort led by the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety to be the most effective means of 
fostering coordination and cooperation among community-based organizations, creating 
cohesive goals and messaging, promoting knowledge and capability-sharing among groups and 
identifying gaps in the community-led support system for communities and individuals. 

The efforts of this collaboration build upon a critically important national and local dialogue 
about countering violence and preserving life. The proposed funding will make a real difference 
to better assist the Los Angeles region in supporting our communities to pursue shared solutions 
that are crucial to our safety, liberty, and the pursuit of prosperous place to live, work, play, and 
connect. 


Sincerely, 


(b) (6) 


Chairman of the Board 
UMMA Community Clinic 




FORM GEN. 180 (Rev. 6-30) 


CITY OF LOS ANGELES 

INTER-DEPARTMENTAL CORRESPONDENCE 


DATE: September 25, 2015 


MEMORANDUM NO. 15-029 


TO: 


All City Office / Department Heads 



FROM: Deputy Controller 

SUBJECT: 2014-15 INDIRECT COST RATES—COST ALLOCATION PLAN (CAP) 37 

Attached are the approved Cost Allocation Plan (CAP) 37 indirect cost rates and 
instructions for their use. Please note, there \were changes from the interim rates 
distributed on March 31, 2015. Changes were made to the Central Services Rates for 
most departments due to reductions in allowed costs for the Information Technology 
Agency, and some Department Administration Rates. 

The State and Local Rate Agreement was approved by the U.S. Department of Health and 
Human Services under contract with the City’s cognizant federal agency, the U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development. These rates must be used in all new 
applications, contracts, and billings for grant activities and computations of overhead 
amounts during fiscal year 2014-15, or as required by your grantor. 

The indirect cost rates for the departments not included in the attached “State and Local 
Rate Agreement were not reviewed by the Federal Negotiator. However, such rates 
included in the attached “Indirect Cost Rates” were audited by the City’s external auditors, 
Simpson & Simpson, CPAs. 

Questions regarding the Cost Allocation Plan or indirect cost rates may be directed to the 
CAP staff at (213) 978-7326 or (213) 978-7327. 

Attachments; A - Indirect Cost Rates 


B - Instructions 

C — Costs Included in Rate Calculations 
State and Local Rate Agreement 




Attachment A 

COST ALLOCATION PLAN 37 (CAP 37) - INDIRECT COST RATES WITH CARRY FORWARD 

The rates below are to be used to prepare grant applications, contracts and billings for grant activities, and to 
compute Fees for Special Services, during 2014-15. They are to be applied only to straight time, gross salaries 
(with CTO). When only net salaries (without CTO) are available, convert net salaries to gross salaries using 
the CTO rate. For rates applicable to part time or overtime salaries, please contact CAP staff. Note: You 
MUST adjust rates to deduct directly billed costs. See Instructions - Attachment B, and Indirect 
Costs Included in Rate Calculations - Attachment C. 


DEPARTMENT/Cost Center 

Fringe 

Benefits 

Central 

Services 

Department 
Administration 
& Support 

Division 

Overhead* 

CTO 

AGING: 

Balance of Department 

41.71% 

27.95% 

n/a 

* 

18.86% 

Title V 

14.85% 

0.61% 

n/a 

it 

0.00% 

ANIMAL SERVICES 

48.75% 

47.62% 

23.90%. 

it 

22.44% 

BUILDING & SAFETY 

40.73% 

14.07% 

22.03% 

* 

21.84% 

CITY ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER (OARS): 

CRA, Petroleum Admin., Proprietary, 

Capital Projects (Phy. Plant) 

34.94% 

13.95% 

19.28% 

h 

21.02% 

Disaster Grants Coordination 

34.72% 

123.83% 

15.79% 

* 

0.00% 

CITY ATTORNEY: 

Criminal 

36.15% 

19 49% 

26.04% 

* 

20.54% 

Direct Billed - User’s Site (Proprietary Depts.) 

34.18% 

5.52% 

26.13% 


20.54% 

Direct Billed - In City Space 

35.62% 

5.74% 

26.26% 

* 

20.54% 

CITY CLERK: 

Elections 

87.36% 

19.38% 

10.66% 

* 

3.29% 

SAS (Formerly Land Record) 

42.93% 

66.29% 

184.48% 

it 

20.93% 

CONTROLLER: 

Direct Billed (at User’s site) 

44.15% 

5.52% 

74.84% 

n 

21.31% 

Direct Billed (in City space) 

44.30% 

9.52% 

75.46% 

it 

21.31% 

CULTURAL AFFAIRS 

52.49% 

37.98% 

80.79% 

* 

17.76% 

DEPARTMENT on DISABILITY 

41.69% 

18.93% 

47.02% 

* 

26.50% 

EL PUEBLO 

54.30% 

0.00% 

60.54% 

* 

18.10% 

ECONOMIC AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT 

Balance of Department 

40.50% 

12.65% 

n/a 

* 

20.97% 

As Needed Employees 

10.52% 

0.00% 

n/a 

* 

n/a 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Em. Prep. Policy & Public info. 

53.62% 

0.00% 

87.84% 

* 

19.41% 

FINANCE. OFFICE OF 

Revenue Collections 

46.23% 

47.30% 

16 12% 

* 

22.98% 

Cash Management & Street Bonds 

35.00% 

49.07% 

16.43% 

* 

0.00% 


9/9/15 


Page 1 of 3 









Attachment A 

COST ALLOCATION PLAN 37 (CAP 37) • INDIRECT COST RATES WITH CARRY FORWARD 

The rates below are to be used to prepare grant applications, contracts and billings for grant activities, and to 
compute Fees for Special Services, during 2014-15. They are to be applied only to straight time, gross salaries 
(with CTO). When only net salaries (without CTO) are available, convert net salaries to gross salaries using 
the CTO rate. For rates applicable to part time or overtime salaries, please contact CAP staff. Note: You 
MUST adjust rates to deduct directly billed costs. See Instructions - Attachment B, and Indirect 
Costs Included in Rate Calculations - Attachment C. 

Department 

Fringe Central Administration Division 

DEPARTMENT/Cost Center _ Benefits _ Services _& Support Overhead* CTO 


FIRE; 


Civilian 


44.01% 

18.73% 

23.32% 

♦ 

23.40% 

Sworn (Firefighters) 


75.31% 

20.09% 

22.10% ^ 

* 

12.65% 


Combined Dept. Admin. & Support Rale. 

15.57% 

Field Support Rate, 


including Field Support Rate 

“ 37.67% c. 1 



GENERAL SERVICES: 







Materials Testing 


39.92% 

21.38% 

10.83% 


19.74% 

Print Shop 


48.04% 

33.22% 

10.44% 

* 

20.69% 

HOUSING: 







Grant-Funded Housing 


39.22% 

11.06% 

n/a 

* 

19.20% 

Enforcement 


46.17% 

14.19% 

n/a 

* 

19.20% 

Internal Administration 


28.73% 

8.51% 

n/a 

* 

19.20% 

LIBRARY 


39.40% 

24.13% 

16.99% 

* 

20.06% 

LOS ANGELES CONVENTION CENTER 

45.38% 

0.66% 

23.05% 

* 

21.56% 

MAYOR; 







Executive/Policy 


39.40% 

38.98% 

17.10% 

* 

15.56% 

Grant Funded/Spec. Programs 


36.57% 

47.38% 

15.33% 

* 

17.00% 

Direct in City Space 


91.13% 

0.00% 

0.00% 

* 

15.56% 

NEIGHBORHOOD EMPOWERMENT 


46.14% 

100.02% 

217.79% 

* 

18.77% 

PERSONNEL; 







Custody Care (Jails) 


42.31% 

6.08% 

20.08% 

* 

23.60% 

Personnel Grant Funded/Spec. Programs 

37.40% 

8.29% 

29.79% 

* 

23.60% 

PLANNING 


41.53% 

37.72% 

42.39% 

* 

20.33% 

POLICE: 







Civilian 


41.62% 

8.99% 

14.72% 

* 

28.44% 

Sworn 


73.37% 

14.70% 

30.56% ^ 

it 

30.84% 


Combined Dept. Admin. & Support Rate. 

31.22% h.-^ 

Field Support Rate, 


including Field Support Rate * 

- 61.78% c. \ 




’"‘NOTE: For Fire and Police, the Field Support rate (line b.) captures overhead costs that are in addition to 
other Administrative and Support Costs. It has been added to the Department Administration rate on this 
schedule. Please use this combined rate (line c.) for sworn positions in field operations. For other, non-field 
sworn positions, do NOT use the Field Support rate; use only the regular Department Administration rate 
(line a.), together with the other (Fringe, Central Service and CTO) rates. 


9/9/15 


Page 2 of 3 





















Attachment A 

COST ALLOCATION PLAN 37 (CAP 37) - INDIRECT COST RATES WITH CARRY FORWARD 

The rates below are to be used to prepare grant applications, contracts and billings for grant activities, and to 
compute Fees for Special Services, during 2014-15. They are to be applied only to straight time, gross salaries 
(with CTO). When only net salaries (without CTO) are available, convert net salaries to gross salaries using 
the CTO rate. For rates applicable to part time or overtime salaries, please contact CAP staff. Note: You 
MUST adjust rates to deduct directly billed costs. See Instructions - Attachment B, and Indirect 
Costs Included in Rate Calculations - Attachment C. 


DEPARTMENT/Cost Center 

Fringe 

Benefits 

Central 

Services 

Department 
Administration 
& Support 

Division 

Overhead* * 

CTO 

PUBLIC WORKS, Board Office: 







Public Services 

33.87% 

62.06% 

6.19% 

* 

19.73% 

PW - Contract Administration: 







Construction Inspection 

35.98% 

7 53% 

10.33% 

25.32% 

21.14% 

PW - Engineering: 







Stormwater Facilities Engineering 

35.28% 

11.85% 

23.39% 

17.45% 

21.35% 

Wastewater Facilities Engineering 

38.29% 

10.15% 

23.61% 

48.22% 

21.35% 

Privately Financed & Assessment 

37.41% 

17.50% 

23.92% 

26.76% 

21.35% 

Street Improvements 

38.26% 

11.51% 

23.82% 

17.72% 

21.35% 

Municipal Facilities 

37.29% 

15.52% 

23.63% 

17.83% 

21.35% 

General Mapping & Survey 

33.55% 

6.50% 

24.27% 

155.94% 

21.35% 

PW - Sanitation 







Solid Waste Program 

51.21% 

108.41% 

5.49% 

it 

23.13% 

Wastewater/Stormwater Division 

36.31% 

26.66% 

3.83% 

* 

23.13% 

PW - Street Lighting 

42.45% 

23.86% 

25.23% 

* 

19.99% 

PW - Street Services 

45.21% 

46 95% 

11.59'; 

0 


27.64% 

Street Maint General 





* 


Street Use Inspection 





* 


Lot Cleaning 





* 


Street Tree Division 





* 


Street Maint Administration 





★ 


ST MNT Facilities Maintenance 

! These ten Division Overhead rates. 




Street Maint Executive 

calculated by St. Services, 

assume that 


A 


Resurf & Reconstr Div 

j Equipment is billed as a direct cost. When 


* 


Special Pro] Constr Div 

Isuch Is done, the Central Services rate will 


*■ 


Street Improvement Div 

1 be reduced to exclude the directly billed 

I equipment. 


it 


RECREATION & PARKS 

64.73% 

39.15% 

13.50% 

* 

23.19% 

TRANSPORTATION 

45.27% 

22.67% 

11.58% 

* 

24.64% 

Zoo Department 

44.51% 

20.66% 

20.90% 

* 

20.58% 


Notes: 

* Division Overhead includes costs of division heads, section supervisors, clerical and other support staff within divisions 
or sections. These co.sts are not part of the Department Administration rate, but are legitimate costs which should be 
recovered if allowed by your grantor. If these costs are not charged directly to a grant, a Division Overhead indirect 
cost rate should be calculated. To maintain consistency and insure that Division Overhead costs do not overlap with 
Department Administration costs, please contact CAP staff for assistance in calculating these rates. Public Works 
Division Overhead rates are computed by Public Works staff and published herein as a courtesy. 


9/9/15 


Page 3 of 3 













ATTACHMENT B 


Instructions for Using Indirect Cost Rates 

Modifying the rates. Usually departments use the CAP rates as published; however, situations may 
arise necessitating revision ot the rates. Your Department’s CAP rate should be modified if your 
Department directly charges to a grant or fee payer any of the indirect costs, or if the grantor 
or fee payer directly provides any of the ser\ices listed on Attachment C. For example, it 
you purchase a computer and the total cost is paid directly by a fee payer or grantor, your CAP rate 
must be reduced to avoid double billing for the directly charged item(s). This means: if the entity you 
are billing provides office space, telephone service, computers, vehicles, or any other item listed on 
Attachment C, your rates must be adjusted to exclude those items. 

An example of the necessity for rate modification is the Police Department's bill to the Airports 
Department. Airports provides space, utilities, telephones and equipment for Police Department 
staff at the Airport substation. To properly bill the Airports Department for law enforcement 
services at this site, the Police Department indirect cost rates are revised to exclude the building 
use, building lease, equipment use, and telephone line items. 

Contact the CAP Office for adjusted rates if any cost listed in Attachment C is directly billed 
to grants or fees, or if any of the listed serv'ices arc provided by your client. 


Using the rates as published. The CAP indirect cost rates are computed based on "gross annual 
salaries" excluding overtime. (For rates applicable to overtime salaries, please contact the CAP 
office.) Compensated time off (CTO) is included in this gross salaries base. (See Attachment C 
paragraph 5 for a definition of CTO.) The CAP Fringe Benefits, Central Services, and Department 
Administration indirect cost rates, therefore, must be applied to salaries which include CTO and 
exclude overtime. Please refer to the example below, where; 


Fringe Benefits Rate 
Central Services Rate 
Department Administration & Support Rate 
Compensated Time Off Rate 


28.10% of Gross Salaries 
39.77% of Gross Salaries 
18.87% of Gross Salaries 
16.26% of Net Salaries 


1. Assume Gross Salaries = $ 1.000.00 Salaries are salaries Jdr straight time 

worked plus Compensated Time Off.) 

Given the above-listed indirect cost rates, and assuming your CTO costs are included in your 
salaries as billed, total indirect costs are calculated below; 


a. 

$ 

1,000 

X 

28.10% = $ 

281.00 

b. 

$ 

1,000 

X 

39.77% = $ 

397.70 

c. 

$ 

1,000 

X 

18.87% = $ 

188.70 


Sum of (a + b + c) = $ 867.40 


Fringe Benefit Cost 
Central Service Cost 

Department Administration & Support Cost 


2. Assume Net Salaries = $ 860.14 (Net Salaries are salaries for straight time worked, not 

including Compensated Time Off. Such net salaries would 
typically be accumulated through direct charges in a cost 
accounting system.) 

Convert net salaries to gross salaries by adding CTO % of Net: 

a. Net Salary times CTO %: $ 860.14 x 16.26%= $ 139.86 = CTO Amount 

b. Net Salary plus CTO amt: $ 860.14 + $ 139.86 = $ 1,000.00 = Gross Salaries 


c. 

$ 

1,000 

X 

28.10% = $ 

281.00 

d. 

$ 

1,000 

X 

39.77% = $ 

397.70 

e. 

$ 

1,000 

X 

18.87% = $ 

188.70 


Sum of (a -r b + c) = S 867.40 


Fringe Benefit Cost 
Central Service Cost 

Department Administration & Support Cost 


REMINDER: CTO rates are to be used only when paid time off such as sick and 
vacation time are not directly charged to a special service or grant project. Please 
see Attachment C, paragraph 5 for further information. 


9/9/15 



ATTACHMENT C 


COST ALLOCATION PLAN 37 INDIRECT COSTS INCLUDED IN RA TE CALCULA TIONS 


1 . 


Fringe Benefits Rate includes the department's share of the Citvwide costs of: 


Retirement (Civilians) 
Pensions (Fire/Police Sworn) 
FLEX Benefit Program 

- Health Insurance 

- Dental Insurance 

- Basic Life Insurance 


Employee Assistance 
Ordinance Life Insurance 
Medicare 
Social Security 

Part Time/Seasonal/Temporary 
(PST) 457 Retirement Plan 


Union Sponsored Benefits 
Unused SickA/acation Payout 
Unemployment Insurance 
Workers' Compensation 
Hiring Hall Fringe 


2. Central Services Rate includes the department's share of the CitvYride costs of: 


Building Leases 
[GSD & Spec. Funds] 

Building Depreciation 
Computer Assets Depreciation 
(items costing $5,(X)0 & above) 

Communications Lease 
(Telephone bill) 

City Administrative Officer 
(CAO, formerly OARS) 

Budget 

Employee Relations & Living Wage 
Gen. Support (Finance, Systems. 
Producttvity & Risk Management) 

Municipal Facilities Projects 

CITY ATTORNEY 
Civil Liability 
Employee Relations 
Municipal Counsel / Legis. Svcs. 
Land Use 
Police Division 

CITY CLERK 

Council and Public Services 
Records Management 

CITY ETHICS COMMISSION 

CONTROLLER 
Accounts Payable 
Budget & General Acctg. 

CAP 

FMIS 

Internal Audit 

Payroll (incl. Fiscal Systems) 

Single Audit 
Workers' Compensation 


Equipment Use Allowance 
(Equipnnent costing $5,000 & above) 
Equipment Exp. Under $5,000 
(Equipment Costing under $5,000) 

Gas (Natural Gas Utility) [GSD] 
Insurance on bond-financed assets 


EMPLOYEE RELATIONS BOARD 


FINANCE 

Citywide Collections 
Custody & Disbursement 
& Debt Administration 

GENERAL SERVICES 
Building Services 
Construction Division 
Fleet Services 

Assets Management (Leasing & Real Estate) 
Mail & Messenger 
Parking Services 
Supply Services 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
AGENCY (ITA) 

IT Services 

Communications Division 
Telecommunications (PPEB) 


General City Purposes (League 
Dues and audits] 

Liability Claims 
Petroleum Products [GSD] 

Vehicle Depreciation 

Water & Electricity 

Emergency Operations Organization 

PERSONNEL 

Workers’ Compensation & Safety 
Personnel Balance of Dept. 


POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Security Services 


PUBLIC WORKS 
Board Office 
Contract Admin; 

Office of Contract Compliance 
Engineering: General Engineering 


PENSIONS: overheads allocated 
TO PENSIONS. (Other Pension 
costs included in Fringe Benefits) 

CERS: OVERHEADS ALLOCATED 
TO CERS. (Other CERS 
costs included in Fringe Benefits) 


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 
Emergency Preparedness Policy & Public Information 


9/9/15 


1 of2 


ATTACHMENT C 


INDIRECT COSTS INCLUDED IN CAP 37 RATE CALCULATIONS (continued) 


3. 


Department Administration and Support Rate includes costs of support functions within a department: 

The rate includes expenditures which: — benefit the department as a whole 

— are NOT directly charged to a grant or fee program 

— are NOT line operations. 


Expenditures include those of: 
Accounting staff 
Budget staff 
Payroll staff 

Personnel & training staff 
Inventory staff 


Department Management (Gen. Mgr. & Asst. Gen. Mgrs) 

Clerical Staff/word processing staff serving the entire department. 
Systems Staff (if serving the whole department, not a special project) 
Warehouse/inventory/stores staff 
Vehicle maintenance staff (Police & Fire only) 


NOTE: The support costs discussed here must conform to Federal definitions of allowable overhead 
costs and are not necessarily the same as the City's General Administration and Support Program 
(GASP) in a departmental budget. 


4. Division Overhead Rates include the costs of support functions within divisions: 

The rate includes the salary and expenses of division heads, section supervisors, and other support 
within divisions which are not included in the Department Administration costs discussed above. For 
example, within the Bureau of Engineering, the City Engineer, Deputies, their secretaries and the 
Administration Division are included in the Department Administration indirect cost rate. Within 
operating divisions, division heads, assistant division heads, and their secretaries and division 
support staff are NOT included in the Department Administration rate. 

To recover the overhead costs within a division, a department or bureau should directly charge the 
time of the division head, secretary, assistant division head, and other division support services 
to a project, or calculate an indirect cost rate to recover their costs. Please work with the CAP 
office when calculating such rates, to insure that Division Overhead costs do not overlap Department 
Administration costs. 


5. Compensated Time Off Rate includes the salary paid to employees who are on paid leave such as: 
Sick Leave Jury Duty Floating Holiday 

Vacation Bereavement leave Injury on Duty 

Holiday Preventive Medicine 

Military Leave Workers' Compensation (salary continuance 

Family Illness paid by the employing department.) 


Special Note regarding CTO: 

CTO rates are to be used only when sick, vacation, and other CTO hours are not directly charged to a 
fee or grant project. For employees who charge only part of their hours worked to a grant, their time off 
is usually not being charged to the project, so the cost of that time off must be recovered using the CTO 
Rate. For employees whose entire annual salary is charged to a fee or grant, CTO is recovered as they 
take their time off, and the CTO Rate is not to be used. When the CTO Rate is applied to net salaries, the 
amount derived is added to net salaries to create gross salaries. The derived gross salaries becomes the 
base against which the fringe benefit rate and other indirect cost rates described above are applied. 


6. OTHER DEFINITIONS 

a. Gross Salaries - Total annual salaries, which include pay for time worked AND compensated time off. 

b. Net Salaries - Pay for time worked only, not including compensated time off. 


9/9/15 


2 of 2 


STATE AND LOCAL RATE AGREEMENT 


City of Los Angeles 
200 N. Main Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90012 


DATE: September 8, 2015 
FILING REF.: The preceding 
agreement was dated: 

08/17/15 G24300 


The rates approved in this agreement are for use on grants, contracts and other agreements with 
the Federal Government, subject to the conditions contained in Section IV. 


SECTION I: CENTRAL SERVICE INDIRECT COST RATES* 
Effective Period 


Type 

From 

lo 

Rate 

Location 

Applicable to 






AGING 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

27.95% 

All 

Balance of Dept. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

0.61% 

All 

Special Fund (Title V) 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

13.95% 

All 

CITY ADMIN. OFFICER (CAO) 

CRA, Petroleum Admin., 
Proprietary, Capital 

Projects (Physical Plant) 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

123.83% 

All 

Disaster Grants Coord. 






CITY ATTORNEY 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

19.49% 

All 

Criminal 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

5.52% 

User’s Site 

Direct (Proprietary/CRA) 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

5.74% 

City Space 

Direct (CDD, Flousing Authority) 






COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

12.65% 

All 

Balance of Department 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

0.00% 

All 

As Needed Employees 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

18.93% 

All 

DEPT. ON DISABILITY 






EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

0.00% 

All 

Emer. Prep. Policy & Public 

Info. 






FIRE 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

18.73% 

All 

Civilian 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

20.09% 

All 

Sworn 






HOUSING 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

11.06% 

All 

Grants Funded Flousing 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

14.19% 

All 

Enforcement 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

8.51% 

All 

Internal Administration 


-1- 




STATE/LOCALITY: City of Los Angeles 
AGREEMENT DATE: September 8, 2015 


SECTION I: CENTRAL SERVICE INDIRECT COST RATES* (continued) 


Type 

Effective Period 

From To 

Rate 

Location 

Applicable to 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

24.13% 

All 

LIBRARY 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

38.98% 

All 

MAYOR 

Executive/Policy 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

47.38% 

All 

Grant Funded/Spec.Prog. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

0.00% 

City Space 

Direct Billed 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

37.72% 

All 

PLANNING 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

8.99% 

All 

POLICE 

Civilian 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

14.70% 

All 

Sworn 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

62.06% 

All 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPT. 

Board Office Direct: Pub. Svcs. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

7.53% 

All 

Contract Administration 
Construction Inspection 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

11.85% 

All 

Enqineerinq 

Stormwater Facilities Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

10.15% 

All 

Wastewater Facilities Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

17.50% 

All 

Privately Fin. Imprv. Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

11.51% 

All 

Street Improvements Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

15.52% 

All 

Municipal Facilities Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

6.50% 

All 

Gen’I. Mapping & Survey 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

108.41% 

All 

Sanitation 

Solid Waste Program 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

26.66% 

All 

Wastewater/Flood Control 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

23.86% 

All 

Street Lighting 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

46.95% 

All 

Street Services 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

39.15% 

All 

RECREATION & PARKS 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

22.67% 

All 

TRANSPORTATION 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

20.66% 

All 

ZOO 


*BASE: Direct salaries and wages including vacation, holiday, sick pay and other paid absences but 
excluding all other fringe benefits. 


-2- 




STATE/LOCALITY: City of Los Angeles 
AGREEMENT DATE: September 8, 2015 


SECTION II: FRINGE BENEFITS RATES* 


lype 

Effective Period 

From To 

Rate 

Location 

Applicable to 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

41.71% 

All 

AGING 

Balance of Dept. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

14.85% 

All 

Special Fund (Title V) 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

34.94% 

All 

CITY ADMIN. OFFICER (CAO) 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

34.72% 

All 

CRA, Petroleum Admin., 
Proprietary, Capital 

Projects (Physical Plant) 
Disaster Grants Coord. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

36.15% 

All 

CITY ATTORNEY 

Criminal 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

34.18% 

User’s Site 

Direct (Proprietary/CRA) 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

35.62% 

City Space 

Direct (CDD, Housing Authority) 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

40.50% 

All 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Balance of Department 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

10.52% 

All 

As Needed Employees 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

41.69% 

All 

DEPT. ON DISABILITY 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

53.62% 

All 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Emer. Prep. Policy & Public 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

44.01% 

All 

Info. 

FIRE 

Civilian 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

75.31% 

All 

Sworn 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

39.22% 

All 

HOUSING 

Grants Funded Housing 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

46.17% 

All 

Enforcement 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

28.73% 

All 

Internal Administration 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

39.40% 

All 

LIBRARY 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

39.40% 

All 

MAYOR 

Executive/Policy 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

36.57% 

All 

Grant Funded/Spec. Prog. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

91.13% 

City Space 

Direct Billed 


-3- 




STATE/LOCALITY: City of Los Angeles 
AGREEMENT DATE: September 8, 2015 


SECTION II: FRINGE BENEFITS RATES* (continued) 


Type 

Effective Period 

From To 

Rate 

Location 

Aoplicable to 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

41.53% 

All 

PLANNING 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

41.62% 

All 

POLICE 

Civilian 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

73.37% 

All 

Sworn 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

33.87% 

All 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPT. 

Board Office Direct: Pub. Svcs. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

35.98% 

All 

Contract Administration 
Construction Inspection 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

35.28% 

All 

Enqineerinq 

Stormwater Facilities Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

38.29% 

All 

Wastewater Facilities Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

37.41% 

All 

Privately Fin. Imprv. Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

38.26% 

All 

Street Improvements Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

37.29% 

All 

Municipal Facilities Eng. 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

33.55% 

All 

Gen’I. Mapping & Survey 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

51.21% 

All 

Sanitation 

Solid Waste Program 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

36.31% 

All 

Wastewater/Flood Control 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

42.45% 

All 

Street Lighting 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

45.21% 

All 

Street Services 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

64.73% 

All 

RECREATION & PARKS 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

45.27% 

All 

TRANSPORTATION 

Fixed 

07/01/14 

06/30/15 

44.51% 

All 

ZOO 


*BASE: Direct salaries and wages including vacation, holiday, sick pay and other paid absences but 
excluding all other fringe benefits. 


-4- 




A. 


STATE/LOCALITY: City of Los Angeles 
AGREEMENT DATE: September 8, 2015 


SECTION III; SPECIAL REMARKS 


TREATMENT OF PAID ABSENCES 

Vacation, holiday, sick leave pay and other paid absences are included in salaries and wages and 
are charged to Federal projects as part of the normal charge for salaries and wages. Separate 
charges for the cost of these absences are not made. 


TREATMENT OF OTHER FRINGE BENEFITS 

This organization uses a fringe benefit rate which is applied to salaries and wages for both 
budgeting and charging purposes for Federal projects. The fringe benefits listed below are included 
in the fringe benefit rate. 

RETIREMENT, FLEX BENEFIT PROGRAM (HEALTH, DENTAL & BASIC LIFE INSURANCE), 
EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE, ORDINANCE LIFE INSURANCE, MEDICARE, SOCIAL SECURITY, 
UNION SPONSORED BENEFITS, UNUSED SICKA/ACATION PAYOUT, UNEMPLOYMENT 
INSURANCE, WORKER’S COMPENSATION & HIRING HALL FRINGE 


BILLED COSTS 

In addition to the costs distributed through the rates cited in Sections I and II, the costs of central 
services listed below may be billed directly to user departments/agencies. 

PRINTING SERVICES DIVISION 


DEFINITION OF EQUIPMENT 

Equipment is defined as tangible nonexpendable personal property having a useful life of more than 
one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per unit. 


This Rate Agreement is issued in accordance with the Customer Service Agreement between 
DHHS/CAS and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 


-5- 






STATE/LOCALITY: City of Los Angeles 
AGREEMENT DATE: September 8, 2015 
SECTION IV: GENERAL 


A. LIMITATIONS : The rates in this Agreement are subject to any statutory or administrative limitations and apply to 
a given grant, contract or other agreement only to the extent that funds are available. Acceptance of the rates is subject 
to the following conditions: (1) Only costs incurred by the organization were included in its indirect cost pool as finally 
accepted; such costs are legal obligations of the department/agency and are allowable under the governing cost 
principles; (2) The same costs that have been treated as indirect costs are not claimed as direct costs; (3) Similar types 
of costs have been accorded consistent accounting treatment; and (4) The information provided by the organization 
which was used to establish the rates is not later found to be materially incomplete or inaccurate by the Federal 
Government. In such situations the rate(s) would be subject to renegotiation at the discretion of the Federal 
Government. 

B. ACCOUNTING CHANGES : This Agreement is based on the accounting system purported by the organization to 
be in effect during the Agreement period. Changes to the method of accounting for costs which affect the amount of 
reimbursement resulting from the use of this Agreement require prior approval of the authorized representative of the 
cognizant agency. Such changes include, but are not limited to, changes in the charging of a particular type of cost from 
indirect to direct. Failure to obtain approval may result in cost disallowances. 

C. FIXED RATES : If a fixed rate is in this Agreement, it is based on an estimate of the costs for the period covered 
by the rate. When the actual costs for this period are determined, an adjustment will be made to a rate of a future 
year(s) to compensate for the difference between the costs used to establish the fixed rate and actual costs. 

D. BILLED COSTS: Charges for the services listed in Section III will be billed in accordance with rates established by 
the State/locality. These rates will be based on the estimated costs of providing the services. Adjustments for variances 
between billed costs and the actual allowable costs of providing the services, as defined by 0MB Circular A-87, will be 
made in accordance with procedures agreed to between the State/locality and the approving agency. 

E. USE BY OTHER FEDERAL AGENCIES : The rates in this Agreement were approved in accordance with the 
authority in Office of Management and Budget Circular A-87, and should be applied to grants, contracts and other 
agreements covered by this Circular, subject to any limitations in Paragraph A above. The organization may provide 
copies of the Agreement to other Federal Agencies to give them early notification of the Agreement. 


BY THE STATE/LOCALITY: 


City of Los Angeles 



Bfilc GAizc^m 

(NAME) 

MAYoi^ _ 

(TITLE) 


(DATE) 





Approved 



ON BEHALF OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT: 
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN 
SERVICES 


m! Karim -A 

(SIGNATURE) 


Digitally sigrwd by Arif M Karim -A 

DM: csUS. »=U.S. Govtrnmmt.oia-HH.^. ousPSC ousfeople, 
cn=Ar*fM.Kanm-A.0.».aJ4J t920C300.100.M=2000J17«6 
1 2 I4:3tt39 ■4?S‘0<y 


Arif Karim 


(NAME) 

Director, Cost Allocation Services 


(TITLE) 

September 8, 2015 
(DATE) 

HHS Representative: Naomi Tamashiro 
Telephone; (415)437-7820 


-6- 



































BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES IN LOS ANGELES 

APPLICATION SUBMITTED BY 
THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES 
OFFICE OF MAYOR ERIC GARCETTI 
MAYOR’S OFFICE OF PUBLIC SAFETY 

FOCUS AREA: MANAGING INTERVENTION ACTIVITIES 


1 



Executive Summary 

Los Angeles (LA) Mayor Erie Gareetti’s Offiee of Publie Safety puts forward the 
Building Healthy Communities in Los Angeles: Managing Intervention Activities proposal for the 
Department of Homeland Seeurity (DHS) Fiseal Year 2016 Countering Violent Extremism 
(CVE) Grant Program in the foeus area of Managing Intervention Aetivities. 

Sinee 2008, LA has been at the forefront of defining the foundation for robust CVE 
prevention and intervention, building interageney trust and formalizing a eollaborative “whole of 
government” and “whole of eommunity” approaeh. In 2015, this approaeh was eodified in the LA 
Framework for CVE, foeused on advaneing eommunity resilienee through building networks, 
engagement, trust-building efforts, and eommunity-driven preventative programs. This proposal 
builds on the initial framework as a key eomponent of a holistie approaeh based on objeetives 
pivotal to ensuring effeetive CVE prevention and intervention, ineluding: (1) Development of a 
oolleetive vision for eommunity-driven impaet; (2) Consolidation of resourees in an aoeessible 
online platform; (3) Creation of a serviee referral system, (4) Building eapaeity of eommunity 
based organizations (CBOs) by faeilitating relationships; and (5) Creating branding and 
messaging program to raise awareness of CVE programs. 

The total proposal eost is $500,000. Of this, $195,000 will be alloeated to CBOs to 
develop and enhanee intervention aetivities; $100,000 for a program eoordinator; $25,000 for the 
ereation of an online information resouree platform; $50,000 for the development and 
implementation of referral system for individuals and CBOs; $20,000 for messaging and 
branding; $80,000 for best praetiee assessment, performanee evaluation and doeument progress; 
$25,000 for CBO CVE training development; and $5,000 to travel. 

This proposal will expand the reaeh and aeeessibility of CVE programming aeross the 
approximately 10 million people in the EA region, and operates and eomplements other CVE 
prevention, resilienee and mental health serviees grant applieations being eonsidered by DHS for 
funding in the LA Area. The City of LA and the LA region is large and has eomplex needs. The 
proposed Building Healthy Communities in Los Angeles: Managing Intervention Activities is a 
eritieal ease management and eommunity outreaeh eomponent of an overall effeetive, 
eoordinated, and eomprehensive eitywide and regional CVE strategy. 


2 



Technical Merit 


The LA Mayor’s Office Building Healthy Communities in Los Angeles - Managing 
Intervention Activities proposal aims to (1) Define a collective vision for community-driven 
impact; (2) Consolidate partners and resources in an accessible network; (3) Operationalize an 
effective referral system; (4) Build CBO capacity by facilitating relationships; and (5) Facilitate 
public messaging and awareness. As outlined in Figure I, to achieve these goals, we propose to 
(1) Expand and coordinate the network of CBOs via a common vision and metrics of success, 
and opportunities for communication; (2) Create a single online resource of available services; 
(3) Design a referral system to connect individuals to relevant services; (4) Build CBO capacity 
through funding and partnerships; and (5) Facilitate branding and messaging to raise awareness 
of services aimed at supportive and safe communities. 

Figure 1: Goals & Activities 


Objective 1 - 
D»v»lop and define 
common visiontdr 
eom/T>uni<y-<*iv*n i 

Objective 2 - 

Com/Mla information i 
oporadonalaa natworii 

Objective 3 - 

Dosignrafarral 

system 

Objective 4 - 

Bui/d CBO capacity 
by facil fating 
connactions 

Objective 5 - 

unified 

carnpdign 

tmpad j 

ACTIVITIES 



v' Community 

^ Davalop wab batad 


•' Biannual 

Wodt with CAG 

Atfvloory Croup 

platform 

V Mulo4acatad 

r^atwodung 

to angprsaar 

diKUMien* on 


avanta CBOs. 

uraAad maaaapa 

Vision foe Loo Angoios. 

^ Matwodi mappriig 
iiaariaoa da^cr 

Rafarrai eyatam 

foundabona 

busnassas. 

Consult wtth 

and 

coraad 

referral lampLkta 

Coortfnadonof 

vtdMdual donors 

brandbto 

complamontary tbdtbn 
ofparvioro 

^ TWO annual 
confaranca* 
woduhopa: sdara 
bast peacbcas. 
evtfuata programs 
astabUsb 

colaDora&ons hou 

tnformahoria 

saminars 

^ Evaluation: Monitor 
and idariify paps 

rafarraka t aarvicaa 

^ Ouartady 

Staadng 
Committaa- 
dtscuss ortgotng 
aHorts. promoia 
commuracabon. 
etc 

^ Thraa 

Roundtablaa 
with CVE 
axparta of 
>mnoiis domains 

agancy 

Coordinate 

anplamant 

puWc 

awarar>aaa 

campaign 


Coordinating the CBO network 

The LA region is fortunate to have a large number of services and government entities as 
partners in CVE. Communication, coordination, and collaboration is therefore particularly 
critical in effective and comprehensive service delivery. The Community Advisory Group 
(CAG), an existing part of LA’s regional coordination efforts with over 25 current members, will 
serve as a foundation for coordination across CBO’s (See Appendix C). It brings together groups 


3 





with expertise in violenee prevention and intervention, and will ereate lasting eollaborations to 
ensure support for eulturally appropriate intervention and prevention programs addressing 
ideologieally motivated violenee. To faeilitate eoordination aeross the network’s CBOs, the LA 
Mayor’s Offiee will eonvene and facilitate regular meetings of the CAG, organize conference- 
workshops to facilitate information-sharing, and monitor and identify gaps in the services. 

Organizations in the network will meet monthly to define a comprehensive, community- 
driven vision around barriers to violent extremism. To further facilitate collaborations and 
opportunities for continuous communication, we will host two annual conference-workshops 
within the grant period, which will include seminars and trainings on community-identified 
topics. The goal of the first conference will be to introduce the network and goals to LA CBOs, 
share best practices, establish steps for collaboration, and discuss systems to facilitate service 
coordination. The second will focus on evaluating established systems and collaborations, and 
explore ways to expand and improve them. 

Building a Unified Information Resource 

Crucial to the coordination efforts proposed is the development of the Communetwork 
web-based platform, a unified information resource that CBOs and individuals may utilize to 
identify and access government and community partners. It will allow individuals to interact and 
volunteer with CBOs, provide information on funding, training, and grant proposal tools and 
opportunities for CBOs, and comprehensively store information regarding Los Angeles CVE 
activities. It will include the categories and capabilities as outlined in Figure 2 below. 

Figure 2: The Communetwork Platform 

The 'Communetwork' Platform 


About 




Co<nmuret«ofk 

PartrvefS 

RefcfUi Tools 

Individuais 






^ —trmTC & 

, roc»o>fWfiiTiaM>or>) | 



GrarteroeoMi 
mYVnotooi* & 




4 




































Building Referral System 

A robust and comprehensive referral system is eritical given the complexities involved in 
preventing recruitment and radicalization, particularly in a region such as LA, which 
encompasses a diverse region with a number of serviee providers and resources. To maximize 
access to appropriate service support, it is vital that resources are well defined and coordinated 
via a multi-faceted referral system, as outlined by Figure 3 below. 

Figure 3: Referral Model Concept 


Referral Model Concept 



Coordinated by the LA Mayor’s Offiee, the referral system will bring together existing 
structures, expand the reach of CBOs, and expand access to programming (including mental 
health, prevention, intervention and other social services). Referrals can come from various 
sources including family, community, schools, CBO’s, City and County services, and law 
enforcement in cases that do not represent an imminent public safety threat. Screening 
individuals upon initial referral will assist in assessing what services are needed for positive 
social outcomes. This will include CBO training for field assessments, and mechanisms more in- 
depth assessments conducted by the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (DMH) 
or other mental health professionals in cases requiring a greater degree of intervention. 

The proposed online platform will provide information to better direct inquiries towards 
appropriate service (e.g. mental health, education and job placement, faith-based organizations), 
who will work together to improve individual outcomes. This network is facilitated by an 


5 
































operational steering eommittee and maintained by a Program Coordinator at the Mayor’s Office 
to ensure that programs are supported and those impacted are improving their lives. The referral 
process requires appropriate intake, assessment, and protocols to protect confidentiality and civil 
rights. The LA Mayor’s Office will continue collaboration with Dr. Steve Weine via the DHS- 
funded Los Angeles research project on the development of the behavioral assessment tools to 
support full development and implementation of this process. 

Expanding CBO Connections and Capacity 

The LA Mayor’s Office will expand the capacity of the CBOs by connecting them to 
partners, resources, and funding that will help support expansion and enhancement of services. 
This will include connections with private partners, government, and academia via ongoing bi¬ 
annual workshops aimed at sharing best practices and resources between CBOs, foundations, 
interested businesses, and individual donors. 

These connections will be augmented with quarterly steering committee meetings 
designed to strengthen relationships and share progress and challenges. These meetings will 
include representatives of school districts, college violence prevention organizations, and 
existing City and County referral networks, and interactions with emergency management and 
response systems, and development of protocols for crisis coordination and communication. 

In addition, we will host three roundtable discussions with nationally and globally 
renowned CVE experts from a variety of domains, including academia, service providers, and 
law enforcement aimed at expanding the tools available to CBOs in their efforts to address 
aspects of violent extremism. Moreover, this grant will allow funding to CBOs to support 
prevention and intervention services to expand the network’s range of available CVE activities. 
Organizations funded will include MPAC, ILM Eoundation, Not in Our Town, and Tiyya 
Eoundation among others. (See Organizational Profiles in Appendix C.) 

Creating Unified Messaging 

Creation of unified messaging and concerted effort to raise public awareness of the 
resources available are critical in ensuring success of this program in communicating availability 
of services, and increasing public referrals. The EA Mayor’s Office will guide CBOs in the 
CAG network in developing a unified message on vision, goals, and services to inform the work 
of a vendor designing branding and messaging. 


6 



Impact & Evaluation 

Building stronger, better supported eommunities and aceess to a diverse network serviees 
will ereate a comprehensive barrier to violence by building connections that increase community 
safety and resilience. This approach presents a coordinated and cost-effective model to 
strengthen community-driven CVE efforts by building on existing capacity, and creating a 
sustainable, multi-faceted, and coordinated regional effort. 

The City will collaborate with the RAND Corporation on an evaluation to ensure 
effectiveness of activities and comprehensive service offerings within the CBO network. This 
includes a needs assessment based on research, network composition, and service gaps. It will 
also assess activities undertaken to fulfdl the proposal goals, and will be designed to complement 
the current DHS-funded pilot evaluation in LA led by Dr. Steve Weine. 

The City of LA recognizes that while the systems being proposed enhance the region’s 
CVE efforts in the social domain, support of interventions in the criminal space for individuals 
who are already in the process of radicalization is also needed. The complexity of this issue and 
the diversity of the LA region requires a robust and holistic approach addressing both (1) the 
social support required by individuals in the very early stages of radicalization, as put forth by 
this proposal; as well as (2) the mental health and law enforcement partnerships critical to 
addressing individuals who may pose a more advanced threat to public safety. To that end, the 
LA Mayor’s Office fully supports and will continue to partner with DMH on its START 
program, which combines mental health professionals with law enforcement personnel to address 
criminal threats. We see both efforts as complementary and necessary in a comprehensive 
continuum of services from prevention, to intervention, and diversion as envisioned in the LA 
CVE Framework. 


1 



Needs Analysis 

Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) efforts in Los Angeles began in 2008 and have 
focused on building interagency trust and formalizing a collaborative “whole of government” 
and “whole of community” approach. These efforts capitalized on the idea that a comprehensive 
network of well-coordinated government, community, and private sector partners is necessary in 
order to prevent violent ideologies from taking root.^ In Eebruary 2015, the City of Los Angeles 
codified its approach in the LA Framework for CVE^, which focuses on advancing community 
resilience through expanding cross-domain engagement efforts, ensuring trust and transparency, 
building networks, and investing in community-driven preventative programs. The framework 
encompasses the “collective impact” approach^, in which a group of key actors from different 
sectors commit to a common agenda for solving a specific social problem."^ Los Angeles was 
recognized by the White House as one of three pilot cities in the United States with a 
conceptually effective prevention framework.^ 

Significant gains have been achieved in putting this conceptual approach to practice. At 
the “whole of government” level, an Interagency Coordination Group (ICG) of local 
government, local law enforcement, and federal authorities has been regularly convening to 
discuss and coordinate outreach and engagement efforts as well as government CVE activities.^ 
In addition, the City government, in coordination with the DHS Regional Office of Community 
Partnerships, has established a regional, multi-domain steering committee, which serves to guide 
the design and implementation of CVE efforts and includes participants from the government, 
law enforcement, communities, and private sector. (See full list of participants in Appendix C.) 
Moreover, the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety has allocated seed funds to the Muslim Public 


' See Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism, April 2015 (Appendix A). 

^ See Los Angeles Framework for Countering Violent Extremism, April 2015 (Appendix A). 

^ The theory of collective impact was initially refereneed by John Kania and Mark Kramer in the Stanford Soeial 
Innovation Review in 2011. 

See http://etb.ku.edu/en/table-of-eontents/overview/models-for-eommunitv-health-and-development/eolleetive- 

impaet/main . It has been proposed as a method of taekling eomplex soeial problems of many ramifieations and 
faeets, sueh as elimate ehange and publie health. Although it has not yet been used in this setting, it ean be similarly 
applied towards prevention and intervention of violent extremism. 

® See FACT SHEET: The White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism; 18 February 2015, 
https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-offlee/2015/Q2/18/faet-sheet-white-house-summit-eountering-violent- 

extremism . 

® The Interageney Coordination Group ineludes the Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department, Los Angeles Poliee 
Department, Los Angeles Human Rights Commission, the Department of Homeland Seeurity, the U.S. Attorney’s 
Offiee, and the FBI. 


8 








Affairs Council (MPAC) to launch the “Safe Spaces” project - an initiative that aims to 
empower Muslim eommunities, by offering a toolkit for how to design safe spaces for addressing 
sensitive questions, personal and politieal frustrations, promote eivic engagement, healthy 
identity, and public safety.^ 

To realize the “whole of community” aspect of the Los Angeles Framework for CVE and 
to further strengthen prevention activities, the Mayor’s Office, in collaboration with regional 
community partners, have begun building a network of CBOs that provide services relevant to 
CVE.^ Driving this effort is the well-established idea that CBOs are best fit to be at the forefront 
of violence prevention, as they are often better attuned to community needs, possess the know¬ 
how to address eommunity eoneems, and enjoy greater community trust.^ Building a well- 
coordinated network of community driven efforts'® will allow to expand the menu of serviees 
available to different communities across the eity of Los Angeles and the region to share best 
practices and competencies across them. As the roots of violent extremism are varied and multi¬ 
faceted, it is particularly important that organizations within the network are able to refer to each 
other for services necessary to help an individual and offer the needed social support. Expanding 
and coordinating this network, building the organizations’ capacity, and ensuring that services 
are accessible and welcomed across different city communities is the focus of the eurrent 
proposal and the program it outlines. 

CBO Network as a Comprehensive Barrier to Violent Extremism 

The objeetive of building a strong and well-coordinated network of eommunity-based 
organizations working to prevent violent extremism is an essential step in fostering eitywide 
resilience to violence. Eollowing the recommendations frequently highlighted in the literature on 
de-radicalization and countering violent extremism, we aim to create “a reliable and democratic 
network of key actors in civil society that people can trust and go to with questions.”" Similar 
frameworks have been successfully used in Netherlands, Denmark, and United Kingdom, where 

See the website for the Safe Spaees program here: http://www mpae.org/safespaees/ 

® See the list of the organizations eurrently in the network in Appendix C. 

® For example, the Flomeland Seeurity Advisory Couneil, in a 2016 CVE Committee Interim Report observed that, 
“to injeet alternative spaees and ideas into eommunities that are vulnerable, it takes organie and loeal initiatives to 
resonate beeause they are trusted.” United States. U.S. Department of Homeland Seeurity. Homeland Seeurity 
Advisory Couneil. CVE Subeommittee Interim Report and Reeommendations. N.p.: n.p., June 2016. Print. 

We will ensure that the network ineludes organizations with various serviees shown to be effeetive in preventing 
evolution of violent behaviors in different eireumstanees. These serviees may range from mental health eounseling, 
family serviees, to job training. 

See eg., Rabasa, Angel et al., RAND DeradicalizingIslamic Extremists 2010 p. 143. 


9 




the guiding thread lies in strengthening the links between vulnerable individuals and 
eommunities. Through eonsultations with the steering eommittee and the eommunity advisory 
board, and in line with the tenets outlined by the theory of community impact,'^ we have 
identified five essential steps for ensuring that the CBO network presents a strong barrier to 
violent extremism. 

First, an effective CBO network demands systematic coordination across community 
organizations. This entails development of a common vision for citywide community driven 
CVE efforts, ensuring continuous communication and mutually reinforcing activities, and 
designing an agreement on shared metrics of success. Currently, community-based CVE-related 
efforts are often disparate and, most often, inaccessible to communities outside of each 
organization’s immediate constituency; the organization's goals may be similar but not fully 
aligned, and knowledge of existing resources are limited. The community advisory board, which 
the Mayor’s Office convened as a step toward better coordination, has recognized the lack of 
systematic coordination across CBOs in Los Angeles as one of the principal factors undermining 
the citywide resilience-building, prevention, and intervention efforts. 

Secondly, it is essential to pool all the information about existing community-driven 
services relevant to CVE and make it publicly available and easily accessible. This way, 
organizations will be able to learn about other service providers and to recruit other 
organizations’ help. A unified source of information will also allow individuals to learn about a 
spectrum of services available to them. Currently, for example, a concerned mother of a young 
man who, she knows, is leaning towards violent ideas does not have a readily available resource 
that would provide her with a menu of options for organizations able to help her son without 
involving law enforcement. Without such a unified and comprehensive resource, concerns often 
remain unaddressed and an individual that could be helped outside the legal system may end up 
trapped within it.'^ 


See http://etb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/overview/models-for-communitv-health-and-development/collective- 

impact/main 

Weine, Stevan, and David Eisenman, “How Public Health Can Improve Initiatives to Counter Violent 
Extremism." START.umd.edu. National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism, 5 Apr. 
2016. Web. 27 Aug. 2016 (“When someone gets carried away by hateful ideology on the Internet, or gets 
approached by a recruiter who wants them to take violent action [...] they may not receive help because 
communities are concerned over becoming entangled in the criminal justice system. By comparison, we believe a 
public health approach may enable this: that a friend, family member, teacher, or clergy member who knows that 
person would notice something was wrong and reach out to an advocate or helping professional in their community. 
This person would know to connect them with a specialized community-based team”). 


10 





A related, third, goal is the ereation of a referral system through whieh appropriate 
serviees ean be identified and, ultimately, rendered to individuals. An individual should be able 
to reach the network of services in multiple ways (e.g., calling in, being referred through an 
organization, or accessing it through a website), each of which would ensure confidentiality and 
efficiency in the process of finding an appropriate service. 

Prominent experts in the field of countering violent extremism agree that formalizing 
public-private partnerships and building intervention teams where psychologists, social workers, 
educators, counselors, clergy, and families can be assembled to create strategies for dealing with 
individual cases is essential.'"^ Thus, the fourth goal is to expand the capacity of the CBOs 
through facilitation of their connections with private partners (e.g., foundations, businesses, 
individual donors) to secure additional funding streams, relevant government agencies to ensure 
their support (whether by funding, services, or other resources) and guidance wherever 
necessary, and academic scholars, who may offer cutting-edge conceptual and theoretical 
knowledge for how to counter violent extremism, to be translated into organizations’ practical 
efforts. 

Private sector-community partnerships are crucial for a number of reasons. First, 
increased funding streams are critical if organizations are to expand their reach and provide their 
services to more people in more communities across Los Angeles.Thus far only limited public 
funding has been directed to support community led CVE initiatives; besides, community based 
organizations may be reluctant to seek funding directly from the government, as it may tarnish 
their credibility in the communities they serve. Therefore, connecting the organizations with the 
private funders eager to allocate resources to community led CVE efforts is key to ensuring that 
the organizations receive the support they need. 

Another important value in private-community partnerships is collaborations with high 
tech and media and entertainment companies. These companies are able to offer important 
platforms for popularizing the messages developed by the community based organizations and to 
counter extremist narratives, provide technical support, and facilitate fundraising (or serving as 
donors themselves). Eurther, private sector actors will be able to complement the efforts of some 


Khan, Humera. "Why Countering Extremism Fails." Editorial. Foreign AffairslS Feb. 2018: n. pag. Print. 

Ibid, “One of the questions practitioners often get asked is why the community does not step up and do something 
about violent extremism. The biggest problem is a lack of funding for the programs that focus on prevention and 
intervention.” 


11 



of the organizations, by, for example, offering opportunities for internships and training. 
Importantly, eollaborations with artists and representatives of Los Angeles thriving movie 
industry will help open new avenues for ereative CVE approaches. 

Community-government connections are of utmost importance as well, to ensure that the 
efforts at both levels are complementary and effective, and that there is an open line of 
communication. In addition to possible funding opportunities, government agencies are often 
able to provide operational support for community based organizations, offer training and other 
resources. Moreover, the relationship between the communities and the government and 
established and practiced protocols for coordination of efforts may prove particularly important 
during and in the follow-up to a crisis. Finally, exchanges with scholars of violent extremism are 
essential for the community based organizations to gain access to continuously evolving research 
on the causes of violent extremism and approaches to counter it. The scholar-practitioner 
collaborations may also be beneficial for helping organizations design and conduct evaluations 
of their efforts. 

While we have begun efforts to bring together private sector, government, academics, 
and community, more work is necessary to build upon and institutionalize these connections and 
ensure their sustainability and evolution. 

The fifth and final goal is to create a unified messaging campaign to ensure that the 
public is aware of the CBO network and the services it provides, and - most importantly - is 
willing to use it. As previous efforts to counter violent extremism often revolved around law 
enforcement, there is a great degree of suspicion of whether CVE efforts are aimed to help the 
communities or to police them. Therefore, the network should implement an effective messaging 
campaign, informing the public of the services available to them and ways to reach them, as well 
as communicating that the goal of all organizations involved in the network is to help individuals 
outside of the legal system. 

Because of its broad reach and capacity to bring together key community actors, private 
sector, government, and academic partners, the Mayor’s Office is uniquely positioned to serve as 
the backbone of these efforts. 


12 



Expertise 

The LA Mayor’s Office of Public Safety will bring to the CVE Grant Program its wealth 
of experience in implementing community violence intervention strategies, its existing 
investment in countering violent extremism, and its proven track record managing federal grants. 

In 2007, the LA Mayor’s Office pioneered a violence intervention strategy to reduce 
gangs and gang related crime using a neighborhood-based approach. The Mayor’s Office Gang 
Reduction and Youth Development (GRYD) Program partners with two dozen non-profit 
community based organizations to provide direct gang prevention, intervention, and re-entry 
services to youth and families impacted by gang violence within high gang-crime areas. 

GRYD’s intervention strategy increases the resilience of youth and families through multi- 
generational case management services and proactive peace-making efforts. Last year, GRYD 
and its agencies conducted more than 11,000 meetings with over 800 gang-involved youth and 
their families, responded to 676 incidents of violence, and spent over 43,000 hours on proactive 
peacekeeping activities. While the City experienced an uptick in overall crime, gang-related 
crime within the City’s “GRYD Zones” dropped 10.2% from the previous year. 

In 2016, the LA Mayor’s Office hired a director to launch its Strategies Against Violent 
Extremism (SAVE). SAVE is currently designing a unique violence intervention model through 
a regional alignment of partnerships, oversight of community-led efforts, and coordination with 
DHS, local and federal law enforcement agencies. SAVE Director Joumana Silyan-Saba’s 
biography and full CV are attached in Appendix E. Additional funding will support staff to 
expand SAVE’s outreach, education, and monitoring of service delivery. 

Since 2005, the LA Mayor’s Office has administered more than $500 million under 
DHS’s Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) grant program for the entire Los Angeles/Long 
Beach (LA/LB) Urban Area. It has developed a robust framework for managing, monitoring and 
reporting of over $60 million UASI grant funds annually to the City, the County, and 20 other 
jurisdictional partners. This expertise has been leveraged to successfully manage the State 
Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP), the Public Safety Interoperable Communications 
(PSIC) Grant, the Regional Catastrophic Preparedness Grant Program (RCPGP), the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), and the Justice Assistance Grant (JAG). 


13 



Budget Detail and Narrative 


LA Mayor’s Office submits the following Budget Detail and Narrative in the focus area of 
Managing Intervention Activities for the amount of $500,000 to support and strengthen 
effeetiveness of eommunity-led prevention and intervention serviees. 


Budget Category 

Federal Request 

Non-Federal Amounts 

Total 

A. Personnel 

$0 

$0 

$0 

B. Fringe Benefits 

$0 

$0 

$0 

C. Travel 

$5,000 

$0 

$5,000 

D. Equipment 

$0 

$0 

$0 

E. Supplies 

$0 

$0 

$0 

F. Construetion 

$0 

$0 

$0 

G. Consultants/ Contraets 

$495,000 

$0 

$495,000 

H. Other 

$0 

$0 

$0 

Total Direct Costs 

$500,000 

$0 

$500,000 

1. Indireet Costs 

$0 

$0 

$0 

TOTAL PROJECT COSTS 

$500,000 

$0 

$500,000 


C. Travel - $5,000 : Funds are dedicated for loeal partners and CBOs to attend conferenees, 
trainings and meetings aimed at information-exehange, and eollaboration, as well as for CVE 
experts to participate in workshops and summits hosted in LA. Funds will be used for airfare 
and federally-approved per diem rates for meals and lodging. 

G. Consultants & Contracts - $495,000 : Funds are dedicated for eontraetual service 
agreements for the expansion of CBO-led activities, the development of intervention and referral 
resourees, messaging, and training. The City of LA uses a eompetitive bid proeess to fulfdl 
eontraeting needs per Seetion 371 of the City Charter. Projeet bids are solieited when a projeet 
request for proposal (RFP) is posted on the Los Angeles Business Assistance Virtual Network 
(LABAVN) website. The site allows any person or ageney to view, free of eharge, and respond 
to eontract opportunities advertised in the RFP postings. This proeess guarantees eosts assoeiated 


14 




















































with services and activities are competitive and reasonable. Prior competitive procurements in 
related field were used as a guide when completing this budget. 


G. Consultant & Contracts Category 

Eederal Request 

Non-Eederal 

Amounts 

Total 

Program Coordinator 

$100,000 

$0 

$100,000 

CBO Activities Support 

$195,000 

$0 

$195,000 

Information Resource Platform 

$25,000 

$0 

$25,000 

Referral System 

$50,000 

$0 

$50,000 

Training Development 

$25,000 

$0 

$25,000 

Messaging and Branding 

$20,000 

$0 

$20,000 

Evaluation & Assessment 

$80,000 

$0 

$80,000 

TOTAL CONSULTANTS & 
CONTRACTS 

$495,000 

$0 

$495,000 


Program Coordinator - $100,000 : Funds are dedicated for a contract with a Program Coordinator 
for specific deliverables within the term of the grant performance period. The Program 
Coordinator will support the LA Mayor’s Office Strategies Against Violent Extremism (SAVE) 
Director (currently funded by Urban Areas Security Initiative funds) and will be responsible for 
coordination of programmatic aspects of this proposal, including the coordination of conferences 
and seminars, facilitating operational steering committees, coordinating referral processes, 
developing and coordinating on-line interface activities, and supporting CBO intervention 
activities. 

CBO Activities Support - $195,000: Eunds in the amount of $195,000 will go directly to the 
capacity building of CBOs within the network to invigorate and deliver a range of intervention 
services and activities. Specific to this focus area, the funds will also assist CBOs through the 
planning process and building of referral pipelines. 

Unified Information Resource Platform - $25,000 : Eunds are dedicated for a vendor contract to 
design a web-based platform, which will contain information on all of the community partners 
and relevant services available through government and private entities, as well as tools for how 


15 









































to access them. Onee developed, the City of LA Information Technology Agency (ITA) will 
provide the needed teehnieal assistanee, maintenanee and sustainability of the online interfaee. 

Referral System - $50,000 : Funds are dedieated for a vendor eontraet to develop and implement 
of multi-faeeted referral system, ineluding referral protoeols between ageneies, unified intake 
and assessment forms, system use training, ensuring privaey of individual information and 
protection of civil rights. As with the Information Resource Platform, the City of LA ITA will 
provide ongoing teohnieal assistanee and maintenanee for sustainment. 

CBO Training Development - $25,000 : Funds will be dedieated to a eonsultant to deliver 
trainings identified by community representatives during the eonferenees, seminars and 
roundtable discussions. Under the eoordination of the Program Coordinator, this eonsultant will 
develop speeifie training eomponents with appropriate subjeet matter expertise, and provide 
training materials and supplies. These trainings will build eapaeity and understanding of CVE 
programing and share knowledge among CBOs as well as the broader eommunities. 

Messaging and Branding - $20,000: Funds will be alloeated to a eontraet with a marketing firm 
to build messaging and branding of CVE intervention and prevention serviees in order to 
inerease referrals and aeeess to the network of serviees. This cohesive messaging and branding 
will allow for a larger publie reaeh. Additionally, funds in the amount of $50,000 have been 
identified from the EY 2016 UASI grant program, and will be leveraged to further develop and 
distribute the media campaign. 

Evaluation and Assessment - $80,000 : Eunds will be alloeated to the RAND Corporation to build 
evaluative measures, provide metries eomponents and to ensure activity outcomes are 
sueeessfully eompleted. This will entail data eollection and analysis, as well as assessing 
effeetiveness and impact of the referral system. Analysis will be shared to improve learning from 
best praetiees and duplieation of sueeessful aetivities. 


16